Andy Chow

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.

Andy gained his in-depth knowledge of Statehouse issues while working for Hannah News Service, an online-based news and research publication. He also participated in the Legislative Service Commission’s Fellowship program as a production assistant for “The Ohio Channel.”

Andy earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting at Otterbein University and took part in the Washington Semester program through American University in Washington, D.C.

Thousands of students are either starting in a new school or still looking for a place to take classes after the closure of the state’s largest online charter school. The Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow is still fighting the state’s claw back of $60 million and blames the state Department of Education for its fate. But one vocal critic says ECOT only has itself to blame.

An estimated 12,000 students must figure out where to go now that the state’s largest online charter school has closed. Marred by budget problems and alleged failure to comply with regulations, ECOT’s sponsor decided to back out. And the sponsor and the school met in a Franklin County courtroom to figure out what happens to the school’s funds and records. 

Clean energy issues have been a sparkplug for debate at the Statehouse for years now, with opposition mostly coming from Republicans and Democrats supporting incentives for the industry. A clean energy group has new data that they say can change the debate during campaign season.

Drug addiction councilors are speaking out against a bill that would send an ex-convict to jail if they fail a drug test. They say this proposal uses the judicial system to solve a health care crisis. 

This week has been one long series of candidate shuffling as different Democratic and Republican contenders for governor have either joined forces with other candidates or moved to another race. One candidate has now dropped out completely.

A state lawmaker is introducing a bill that would require drug companies to slash their prices. The legislation is similar to the measure voters overwhelmingly voted down on last year’s ballot. The senator says there are some key differences that might help its chances, though Democrats are deep in the minority.

The Trump Administration is clearing the way for states to attach work requirements for Medicaid. The announcement has sparked outrage among health care advocates. This can mean some changes for the state’s program.

The state’s largest online charter school could be in danger of closing in the near future with the news that the school is losing its sponsor. This is just the latest domino to fall for the Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, which has been battling financial and regulatory issues for years now. 

Lawmakers are off and running on the contentious issue of changing the way the map of Ohio’s Congressional districts is drawn. Reforming that process is meant to stop the practice of gerrymandering, when the lines benefit one party over another. But the outline of a new proposal has caused a rift between several groups.

Ohio utilities are considering their next steps after federal regulators knocked down a measure that would’ve allowed subsidies for struggling power plants. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, there are still options from state lawmakers.

Lawmakers are returning to the Statehouse from their holiday break. The outnumbered Democrats in the House have a list of goals they want to achieve. And they have a game plan for getting Republican support.

An Ohio lawmaker wants the state to take tougher action when an ex-convict on parole fails a random drug test. The proposal is meant to act as an intervention for addicts.

Congress is sending a bill to the president in their push to address the nation’s drug epidemic. The legislation will give border agents access to high-tech equipment, making it easier to detect and stop the flow of the highly potent painkiller fentanyl.

Contractors believe 2018 will be a big year for projects from infrastructure improvements to corporate office updates. But a national survey shows one big challenge is set to stand in the way of these projects.

This year’s biggest drama at the Ohio Statehouse centered around the ongoing struggles between Gov. John Kasich and the Republican-controlled Legislature. They culminated in a continuing battle over vetoes.

A controversial bill dealing with whether an employer can force workers to get the flu shot is still sitting in the Ohio House. The bill is set to get a new round of committee hearings.

This year saw a lot of talk at the Ohio Statehouse over big blockbuster issues that have been stewing in the legislature for a while. But after all that talk, several of these issues didn’t really go anywhere.

The federal tax overhaul Congress passed earlier this month amassed a lot of attention and what it would do as far as tax breaks and increases. But a provision was slipped into the large piece of legislation that has many environmental advocates concerned. 

The U.S. House and Senate have passed the most sweeping tax overhaul in decades, with the bill splitting down party lines. Democratic U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown contends that this only benefits the rich, while his Republican counterpart Rob Portman argues that this can help pay down the deficit in the long run. 

The Senate plans to deliver the final blow to what are currently known as Ohio’s green energy standards. These standards require utilities to get a certain amount of energy from renewable sources. A bill to toss out those requirements could move first thing next year.

State and county leaders have been trying to figure out how to patch up budget holes that opened up when the federal government took away the ability to tax Medicaid managed care providers. Lawmakers reached a compromise but falls far short of filling the gap.

The surprise win by a Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate in Alabama has caused interesting and even unexpected reactions all around the country. That includes the Ohio’s Republican House speaker.

Lawmakers in the Statehouse are landing on different sides of a debate over the criminal records of human trafficking victims. The argument is over what measures the state should take to conceal and even wipe out those records.

A bill in the Ohio House would attempt to reform the jail system by basing bail off of a person’s risk to society rather than how much money they have. The ACLU likes the idea but says more should be done to stave off any bias.

A state lawmaker says the way bail is set for people who are arrested can sometimes be a backwards process. He proposes a way to overhaul the system and base it off of risk rather than money.

The state is approaching a new era in school report cards as districts will receive an overall letter grade next year. A research group wants Ohio to change their formula before those new grades come out.

The state has awarded nearly $10 million for several research and development projects that aim to stem opioid addiction, part of the $20 million Gov. John Kasich said he wanted to set aside for high-tech solutions to the epidemic. This could be the first step in changing the face of the fight.

A controversial bill that intends to shore up the fund the state uses to pay unemployment benefits might be moving forward soon. The bill’s sponsor says he's trying to thread the needle between what labor and business groups want.

House Republicans are taking another shot at denying workers’ compensation for undocumented immigrants. The fight now goes to the Senate.

An issue that some believe will reignite the wind energy industry is getting a new wave of support. A previous version of the bill stalled after the resignation of a senator. 

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