Andy Chow

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.

Andy gained his in-depth knowledge of Statehouse issues while working for Hannah News Service, an online-based news and research publication. He also participated in the Legislative Service Commission’s Fellowship program as a production assistant for “The Ohio Channel.”

Andy earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting at Otterbein University and took part in the Washington Semester program through American University in Washington, D.C.

The bill to clampdown on payday lending interest rates and fees has hit another wall. After passing out of the House with strong support, Senate Republicans have halted the bill in committee in order to consider possible changes. 

The Ohio General Assembly has let the dogs out.

On Wednesday, the Ohio Senate passed a bill that would allow dogs on restaurant patios, something that business groups see as a way to let companies expand their creativity.

Ohio lawmakers are preparing for a busy week at the Statehouse as they’re set to pass several big bills before leaving for summer break. As Statehouse correspondent Andy Chow reports, this week could set the tone for the lawmaking agenda for the rest of the year.

The payday lending bill is headlining the week as supporters and opponents clash over the measure. Consumer advocates are trying to fight proposed changes that they believe would gut the bill.

Lawmakers are preparing for a busy week at the Statehouse as they’re set to pass several big bills before leaving for summer break. This week could set the tone for the lawmaking agenda for the rest of the year.

The new House speaker says now that the seven week long fight to elect him is over, it’s time to regain focus on several big issues. Among those - an effort to reform the state’s unemployment compensation fund. 

Ohio’s top Democratic elected official is fighting the state’s process when it comes to scratching voters off the rolls. The new bill is in response to a U.S. Supreme Court ruling approving Ohio’s voter roll cleanup process. 

A pro-gun group is taking two Ohio cities (Columbus, Cincinnati) to court over their new laws that tighten firearm regulation. The dispute revolves around a ban on bump stocks.

The Ohio House passed a high-profile bill to reform criminal sentencing and strengthen probation monitoring. The bill is in response to the murder of an OSU student last year.

The Ohio House is preparing to strip away more gun regulations making it easier to use lethal force in self-defense. This comes as the new House leader says Republican members aren’t close to approving new gun control measures. 

Gov. John Kasich says Ohio should be doing everything it can to defend the part of the Affordable Care Act that requires health care coverage for people with preexisting conditions. This once again positions Kasich against President Donald Trump, who has said his administration will not fight for the law. 

More than $20 million could soon be pumped into projects that help keep Lake Erie clean. Most of that money would help fund equipment that helps limit nutrient runoff from farmland. But there are state leaders and environmental advocates who say that’s still not good enough. 

May’s 20,000 new private sector jobs in Ohio mean the state is outpacing the nation in job growth rate so far this year, though the state had no measurable job growth in all of last year. But Gov. John Kasich warns that this trend will be short-lived if leaders take their eye off the ball. 

One of the most controversial bills moving through the Statehouse is the so-called “Stand Your Ground” bill. Pro-gun groups are for the legislation and say it removes the requirement to try and retreat before taking lethal action. But there’s a separate battle happening within the bill.

A coalition of public universities is touting a study that says income from schools, their students and alumni adds up to $42 billion pumped into the state’s economy. 

A measure to crackdown on the shipment of opioids from China is moving its way through Congress. That's according to Republican U.S. Senator Rob Portman who touts this provision as a key tool in the fight against the drug epidemic. 

There may be an end in sight when it comes to the House Speaker impasse that’s caused dysfunction at the Statehouse. A plan has been proposed that could result in either a new speaker or an interim leader who would act as a stand-in for the rest of the year, though some Republicans oppose the idea, and many Democrats say they won’t participate in it. One of the biggest issues the new Speaker could deal with right away is a controversial one - payday lending.

Anti-tobacco groups are calling on lawmakers to raise the tax on products that have been left out of recent increases, such as e-cigarettes and chew. They’re reigniting this call as part of World No Tobacco Day. 

A conservative think tank is responding to a new report urging the state to invest in clean energy, saying the industry is evolving and could be a good investment, but that doesn’t mean it needs to be propped up by government. 

A study is urging Ohio leaders and policymakers to support clean and alternative energy now before it’s too late. One researcher says there’s a ticking clock on the economic benefit the state could harness. 

A group that advocates for the rights of landowners is fighting back against a bill that would allow for more wind turbines to pop up. The bill addresses how far turbines can set back from property lines. But the wind energy industry says those setbacks must be reduced in order for more development. 

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