Andy Chow

Andy Chow is a general assignment state government reporter who focuses on environmental, energy, agriculture, and education-related issues. He started his journalism career as an associate producer with ABC 6/FOX 28 in Columbus before becoming a producer with WBNS 10TV.

Andy gained his in-depth knowledge of Statehouse issues while working for Hannah News Service, an online-based news and research publication. He also participated in the Legislative Service Commission’s Fellowship program as a production assistant for “The Ohio Channel.”

Andy earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in broadcasting at Otterbein University and took part in the Washington Semester program through American University in Washington, D.C.

A battle is brewing over payday lending in Ohio. There are more than 650 storefronts in the state but the industry argues that a new bill threatens to shut them all down. However, consumer advocates say payday lending has been skirting around state law for years to prey on desperate borrowers. 

Consumer, business, and environmental groups are rallying to oppose FirstEnergy’s request for a federal bailout now that the company’s subsidiary FirstEnergy Solutions has filed for bankruptcy. This could be the major utility company’s last shot at keeping its nuclear and coal plants open. 

One of Ohio’s largest utilities is moving forward with a plan to shut down its coal and nuclear power plants after filing for bankruptcy. The move has spurred action among its workers.

President Donald Trump is in Ohio touting his new plan to bolster infrastructure projects by injecting $200 billion of federal money. But a top Democrat in Ohio says Trump is not holding up his campaign promises.

The Democratic candidate for attorney general is rolling out a new slate of policy proposals to crackdown on what he sees as corruption in state government. The plan includes an easy way for everyday Ohioans to be government watchdogs.

The march towards reforming Ohio’s payday lending industry has experienced several shifts in momentum. Now, as it seems like the issue had stalled again, the Republican house speaker is calling in his ace to recommend changes in the bill. 

Lawmakers are lining up their priorities for policymaking once they return from their spring break. And the top leader in the Senate says he has a particular issue he expects to address when they come back.

Senate Democrats are firing back against a study that says Ohio’s huge number of regulations on business is hampering the state’s economic growth. One lawmaker even argues that the study is a cop out to avoid the bigger problem. 

The top leader in the Ohio Senate says he wants to hit the “reset” button on policymaking. The Republican lawmaker is using a new study to show that Ohio is leading most other states in regulatory restrictions. 

It’s thought that if the state went into a recession now, its unemployment compensation fund wouldn’t be able to pay laid-off workers for more than a few weeks. But there’s still been no progress on a bill that’s touted as a way to fix the fund. These hearings have become routine with many still waiting for action.

A health care association is touting what its members believe to be a clear path Ohioans can take to cut down on opioid addiction. This path would take a culture change when it comes to the reputation of alternative medicine.

A central Ohio lawmaker is seeking a ban on fracking in certain parts of the state. The proposal comes as a commission that regulates this types of drilling prepares for its first meeting.

A group is taking another swing at getting an issue on the ballot that would cap payday loan interest rates. The initiative was delayed after the attorney general’s office rejected the first set of petitions. 

Gov. John Kasich’s parole board is recommending that he call off next month’s execution of an inmate convicted of killing a woman in a robbery in Toledo in 1986. The board came to their decision based on the questionable actions of the prosecution.

A healthcare advocacy group delivered hundreds of letters to the state Medicaid office to express their opposition to work requirements for certain Medicaid recipients. 

A House panel listened to hours of testimony against a plan that would overhaul the state’s education system. The proposal would consolidate departments into one large education agency which answers directly to the governor. Many of the people lined up to speak against the bill are parents who homeschool their kids.

For seven years, Ohio lawmakers have been cutting down on gun regulation. But while there are 22 gun-related bills pending in the legislature right now, lawmakers have recently pumped the brakes on passing the most controversial ones. Gov. John Kasich has recently turned around on gun control measures, proposing a package of six bills he calls “reasonable”. That has gun rights supporters voicing their frustration.

During his final State of the State address, Gov. John Kasich said Ohio is the strongest it’s been in a generation. But a coalition of unions and health and human services organizations say they think they have the data to prove that’s not true.

President Donald Trump has found an unlikely supporter in his contentious effort to raise tariffs on imported steel - that supporter is Ohio’s top ranking Democrat. 

House Republicans are defending the proposal that would merge several departments into one large education agency which would report directly to the governor. Elected local school boards are sounding off on how it would change the state board of education.

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