Jerry Kenney

Jerry Kenney was introduced to WYSO by a friend and within a year of first tuning in became an avid listener and supporter. He began volunteering at the station in 1991 and began hosting Alpha Rhythms in February of 1992. Jerry joined the WYSO staff in 2007 as a host of All Things Considered and soon transitioned into hosting Morning Edition. In addition to now hosting All Things Considered, Jerry is the host and producer of WYSO Weekend, WYSO's weekly news and arts magazine. He has also produced several radio dramas for WYSO in collaboration with local theater companies. Jerry has won several Ohio AP awards as well as an award from PRINDI for his work with the WYSO news department. Jerry says that the best part of his job is being able to talk to people in the community and share their experiences with WYSO listeners.

The City of Dayton is suing several manufacturers that made products containing toxic chemicals that have threatened the city’s water supply. 

There are five companies named in the city of Dayton Lawsuit - 3M Company, Buckeye Fire Equipment Company, Chemguard, Inc., Tyco Fire Products L.P., and National Foam, Inc. 

The city says the defendants operated in Dayton at some time and used the chemical perfluorooctane sulfonate or PFOS in the manufacturing of a foam product used to fight fires.

The Libertarian candidate for governor has weighed in on Ohio Issue 1, known as the Drug and Criminal Justice Policies Initiative. In a statement Monday, Travis Irvine called the ballot measure “imperfect,” but “a step in the right direction."

This year marks the 50th anniversary of Dayton, Ohio’s sister city relationship with Oiso, Japan, and to mark the occasion, officials will welcome a delegation from Oiso to the city next summer.

Dayton actually has five sister cities around the world. “The oldest of which is Augsburg, Germany,” says Kevin Lydy, chair of the Dayton-Oiso Sister City Committee. “That [relationship] was established in 1964. Oiso, Japan is our second oldest, in 1968, and then we have three others: Holon, Israel, Sarajevo and Bosnia-Herzegovina, and then Monrovia and Liberia.”

The designer of an iconic automobile has come back home to Dayton. Gale Halderman was born in Tipp City. He graduated from Bethel High School in 1950 and then attended art and design classes at the Dayton Art Institute. It may be surprising that the name behind one of America’s most popular sports cars didn’t set out to design anything like it.

“I loved to do lettering,” he says. “I used to letter all the school buses at school when I was in school. And then I saw this class that was designing televisions and bicycles and I thought, boy does that look exciting.”

The city’s aviation heritage was on full display Friday morning as Dayton History officials announced Carillon Park is now home to the John W. Berry, Sr. Wright Brothers National Museum.

Formerly known as the Wright Brothers Aviation Center, the federal designation as a national museum is a “game-changer,” says Dayton History President Brady Kress.

The Dayton Mediation Center was established by the city in 1987, “in an effort to ease the impact of community conflicts on public resources.”  The center intervenes in conflicts between residents, neighborhood organizations, businesses, employers and employees, schools, law enforcement agencies and even the Dayton court system.

Emergency medical services are no longer available at Good Samaritan Hospital in West Dayton. A group of around 40 westside residents and community activists protested the ER's closure outside the hospital at lunchtime Thursday.

As crews shuttered the emergency department, members of the Community Clergy Coalition and the Black Panther Dayton Chapter groups were among those voicing outrage at the impending closure of the hospital, saying the decision will disproportionately affect Dayton neighborhoods of color.

Attorneys representing the West Dayton Clergy Community Coalition group announced Monday the United States Department of Health and Human Services has opened an investigation into the planned closure of Good Samaritan Hospital. Attorney Ellis Jacobs with Able Law says the agency has also asked to meet with Premier Health Partnership officials within the next five days.

2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the The National Wild and Scenic Rivers System Act. The law was created by Congress in 1968 “to preserve certain rivers with outstanding natural, cultural, and recreational values in a free-flowing condition for the enjoyment of present and future generations.”

To commemorate the anniversary, the Little Miami Watershed Network (LMWN) of local organizations are putting some extra effort in raising awareness of the river, its tributaries and their importance to the Miami Valley.

A Miamisburg site that played a big role in nuclear history will soon be open to the public. It’s the home of the former Mound Laboratories - known to some in the Miami Valley for its important role in developing the first atomic bomb.
 
Beginning this month the Cold War-era Mound will also house a new Dayton History museum. Organizers hope it will showcase this critical but often controversial chapter of American history.

At the height of operations after World War II, Mound Laboratories in Miamisburg employed around 2,500 workers.

Dayton officials announced Tuesday plans to create a task force to assess the condition of the Dayton Convention Center facility, its finances and future development potential.

Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley delivered the annual State of the City address Wednesday at City Hall.

In the 20 minute speech, the Mayor outlined the city’s progress in job growth, infrastructure improvements, and investments in revitalization projects like the Dayton Arcade, Welcome Dayton and residential housing in the downtown area.

During a news conference Wednesday, Mayor Nan Whaley announced that Dayton will be the first major city in the state to offer paid parental leave to its male and female employees.

It’s pretty much accepted by education researchers that preschool attendance has positive long term effects—people who go to preschool are more likely to be successful in K-12 education and to adapt socially to being around other kids. Yet, preschool numbers for Latino kids nationally and in Ohio are lower than other ethnic groups. 

The Educational Track

Wayne Baker / WYSO

A grand jury in Greene County has found that the actions of officers involved in the Beavercreek Walmart shooting were justified. In response, the U.S. Department of Justice has announced it will investigate. 

Twenty-two-year-old John Crawford III was fatally shot by police in the store the evening of August 5th. A 9-1-1 caller reported Crawford was waving what appeared to be a rifle. Police said he didn't obey commands to put down what turned out to be an air rifle BB-gun.

On April 18, 1942, in response to the Japanese attack the previous December on Pearl Harbor, 80 men in 16 B-25 bombers took off on a secret mission to bomb Japan. Led by James H. "Jimmy" Doolittle, they became known as the Doolittle Tokyo Raiders.

On Saturday, three of the four remaining Raiders met for what is likely to be the last time at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio.

Federal officials investigating Saturday’s plane crash at the Dayton Air Show say it may take up to a year before the cause of the crash can be determined.

An initial coroner’s report say that 44-year-old wing-walker Jane Wicker and the plane’s pilot, 64-year-old Charlie Schwenker, died of blunt force trauma.

The National Transportation Safety Board expects to release an initial report later this week. The NTSB is also requesting anyone with video or pictures of the crash to submit them to air show officials to help with the investigation.

Near the back of the North YMCA in Columbus, Ohio, several men and women line up on a row of beat-up platforms. They take turns practicing the two lifts that make up Olympic weightlifting; the "Snatch," and the "Clean and Jerk."

The goal? To hoist large amounts of weight from the floor into an overhead position.

Among the lifters here is 5-foot-8 inch, 350-pound Holley Mangold. She is the epitome of power, in appearance, attitude and athletic ability.