The Blues with Lee Hay

Saturdays at 11 PM
Jazz Fest 2013

This week on "The Blues," Saturday night at 11pm, November 10th, the first set begins with Long John Hunter, Hank Crawford, Lou Rawls, and Shemekia Copeland.  Hank Crawford performs one of my favorite songs, "Misty," which he recorded in October, 1960 for Atlantic Records.  

During the second set of "The Blues," you'll hear Eric Clapton, Harper, Shannon Curfman, and Robben Ford & the Blue Line.  And, the show ends with music from Gov't Mule, Charlie Musselwhite, the Kenny Wayne Shepherd Band, Leon Russell, and Dr. John.

Michael Wilson

This week's blues show, Saturday, November 3rd at 11pm begins with Keb' Mo', local blues musician Kelly Richey, and RatDog with the great Charlie Musselwhite.  The second set features music from Keith Little, High Street Rhythm Rockers, and Allen Touissant.  

Paul Butterfield's in the spotlight in the third set with two songs, plus an interview Ron Esposito did with the director of the film, "Horn From the Heart: The Paul Butterfield Story," which will be presented at the Woodward Theater on Wednesday, November 7th at 7pm in conjunction with the Cincy Blues Society.

James Flames

Welcome to a Halloween edition of The Blues!  One of our favorite holidays of the year!  You'll hear this evening, Saturday, October 27th at 11pm, music from Dr. John (of course), Tom Waits, BB King, and Lightnin' Hopkins plus many others to get you in the mood for the haunting weekend.

This blues show, Saturday, October 20th, at 11pm, starts off with Johnny Adams, Jonell Mosser, Lucinda Williams, and Linda Tillery & the Cultural Heritage Choir.  The second set features Eric Clapton, Gov't Mule, the Kenny Wayne Shepherd Band, and Leon Russell.  

The last set of the evening begins with the Sonny Moorman Group, Key to the Highway with vocals by Larry Goshorn, Joe Louis Walker, Tommy Emmanuel, and ends with Nina Simone.

This week on The Blues, Saturday evening, October 13th at 11pm, you'll hear from Shemekia Copeland's new album, America's Child, Albert King, the Goshorn Brothers, and Peter Frampton in the first set.

The second set starts off with two songs with Eric Clapton from his time with Derek and the Dominos and Cream.  There's also the classic "Hideaway" from King Records recording artist Freddie King, and "Dirty Pool" from Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble's first studio album, "Texas Flood," Epic Records, 1983.

And the show ends with some favorites, Charlie Musselwhite, Diana Krall, Eva Cassidy, and Ken Nordine.  Technical assistance from Ben Fibbe & Rick Andress.

Chicago bluesman Otis Rush passed away last Saturday, September 29th.  In his honor during my blues show on Saturday, October 6th, at 11pm, you'll hear some of the music he recorded over his long career.

The one-hour special begins with his first single, "I Can't Quit You Baby," which he recorded in 1956.  You'll also hear other songs from his Cobra recordings as well as songs from his albums, "Cold Day in Hell," "Lost in the Blues," and "Any Place I'm Going."

Otis Rush also recorded with Duane Allman in 1969, so you'll hear three of those songs from their sessions at Fame Recording Studio in Muscle Shoals.

This week on The Blues, Saturday night, September 29th, at 11pm, we'll start off with Curtis Salgado, Stevie Ray Vaughan & Double Trouble, John Scofield, and Eric Clapton's "Layla" from his "Unplugged" cd.

The second set will feature Janiva Magness, Red Garland from 1961, and Etta James.  And, the show ends with Ricky Nye, Wendy DeWitt, Shemekia Copeland (from her new release, "America's Child" on Alligator Records), and the Blind Boys of Alabama.

 

In honor of the 75th anniversary of King Records this month, the last special I'm producing has a potpourri of topics from a look at the Tokyo Happy Coats and Playhouse in the Park's production of "Cincinnati King" to Darren Blase's efforts to showcase his King Records collection at Shake It Records, plus the preservation work being done to save the King Records studio on Brewster Avenue.  

This King Records Potpourri special will air on Saturday night, September 22nd, at 11pm and again Sunday evening, September 23rd, at 7pm.

This presentation is on the third floor of the Main Library downtown, and at 2pm right before Roy Baugher's slideshow, Darren Blase from Shake It Records will be on the first floor talking about the comeback of vinyl recordings.  A great afternoon of musical history Saturday afternoon, September 22nd, at the Main Library downtown!

This King Records special will feature interviews with Waddell Falland & Jimmy Railey who were both members of The Solars, Bobby and the Expressions, & The Famous Flames, two of the Sisters of Righteous, Dr. Kay Robinson, and two of The Dapps.  Waddell Falland and Jimmy Railey spoke with me in 2007.  Geneva L. Kinard Woode & Denise Kennard Crowley from the Sisters of Righteous talked with Brian Powers about their careers at King Records as teenagers and backing up numerous King musicians including Hank Ballard.  Dr. Kay Robinson shared her thoughts on recording a gospel album for JBP.  Dave Parkinson, saxophonist, & Eddie Setser, guitarist, from The Dapps, also share their memories of working for James Brown Productions.  

amoeba.com

In honor of the 75th anniversary of King Records, music historian Brian Powers spoke with a number of folks this summer about their work with James Brown Productions which was based in the King Records building on Brewster Avenue.  From 1965 to 1971, James Brown's company created a new genre of music producing many hit records and was involved in civil rights and the Black Pride movement.  During this hour, which airs on WVXU/WMUB on Saturday, September 8th at 11pm and repeats on Sunday, September 9th at 7pm, you'll hear interviews with Brown's publicity director/tour manager Alan Leeds, his arranger David Matthews, and from musicians Carmon DeLeone and Chuck Sullivan, as well as related music.

King Records Month in Cincinnati kicks off Saturday, September 1st, at Listermann Brewing Company with their latest 4-pack of limited edition beer, “The King of Them All,” in honor of King Records.  “The King of Them All” is a salute to the day, 75 years ago in September, 1943, when Grandpa Jones and Merle Travis recorded the first songs for King Records. 

In honor of the 75th anniversary celebration of King Records in September, Lee Hay and Brian Powers have teamed up for another series of specials about some of the musicians who recorded at King Records.

The first special will feature "The King of Hillbilly Piano Players," Moon Mullican who recorded at King Records from 1946 until the late 1950's and was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1951.

The special will air on WVXU/WMUB on Saturday evening, September 1st at 11pm; Sunday, September 2nd at 7pm; and Labor Day, Monday, September 3rd at 1pm.

Oscar Pepper, Moon Mullican's nephew, spoke with Brian Powers by phone from his home in Texas on February 25, 2018.  He shares memories of Moon's early life in Texas, the Grand Ole Opry, his songwriting career & royalties, and also Moon's funeral and gravesite.

This week's blues show at 11pm, Saturday, August 18th, is a trip down the Mississippi to New Orleans, because Trombone Shorty's Voodoo Threauxdown tour is coming to PNC Pavilion Saturday night, August 25th.  

The annual Cincy Blues Fest is returning to Sawyer Point this weekend for a one-day musical event, Saturday, August 11th.  The festival runs from 2:30 - midnight on two stages with the headliner Delbert McClinton taking the stage at 9pm, Saturday night.

Other bands on the Budweiser Main Stage include Leroy Ellington's Sacred Hearts, The Noah Wotherspoon Band, plus Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna Project.  The Arches Boogie Piano Stage will feature Ben Levin, Ricky Nye, and Judy Carmichael among others that day.

Tyler Zoller

The Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band is playing the Bacon, Blues & Brews festival in Batesville, Indiana, Saturday, July 28th.  This is a  3-piece country blues band from southern Indiana with a large fan base here in the area.  Update: This festival is already sold out.  No tickets remain.  There were only 450 available to start with according to the festival's website.

This summer, we're sharing specials about King Records that I've produced over the past 10 years or so leading up to the 75th anniversary celebration of King Records on August 25th.  Details of the event are still being worked out, so as soon as they become available, I'll post on this website.

On this King Records special on July 7th at 11pm, you'll hear about jump blues artist, Bull Moose Jackson, who ruled the R&B charts from the late 40s and early 50s. Bull Moose Jackson, best known for “Big Ten Inch,” had his first big hit in 1947 with “I Love You, Yes I Do,” which is widely accepted as the first R &B single to sell a million copies. Jackson had 12 hits from 1946 to 1952 on the R& B chart.

On this King Records rockabilly special, Saturday, June 30th at 11pm, the King of Covers, Delbert Barker, is featured.  Mr.

This Saturday night, June 23rd at 11pm, you'll hear a King Records special about three musicians who recorded country music there.  In 2008, I spoke with Orangie Ray Hubbard, Jr Spivey, and Herman Cress about their work at King Records.  Orangie Ray Hubbard came into the studio on 5/20/08 and returned a second time with Jr Spivey on 8/5/08.  I also had a  conversation with Herman Cress on 10/14/08.  Herman Cress played upright bass in Orangie Ray Hubbard's band with Jr Spivey on guitar.

During this one-hour special, you'll hear Orangie talk about his roots in Barbourville, KY, his life in Detroit, and his move back to Cincinnati and his musical career.   He discusses payola, Rusty York's studio, Syd Nathan, and Louis Innis.  Jr Spivey shares his memories of recording with another King Records musician, Hank Ballard, as well as recording with Orangie Ray Hubbard and playing with Lonnie Mack. Herman Cress also remembers Ray Pennington, Lucky Records, and playing with Orangie.  In addition to these interviews, you'll hear some of the songs recorded by Orangie Ray Hubbard at King Records and another by Herman Cress.

Pages