Barack Obama

hillary clinton mailings
Carolyn Kaster / AP

Most of the American people have never seen Hillary Clinton lose her temper or blow her cool, reasoned demeanor in public.

Not even when she would have been entirely justified in doing so, after being provoked again and again two years ago.

barack obama dayton
Skip Peterson / AP

Ed. note: Howard Wilkinson launched his "Tales from the Trail" column on July 15, 2017, in an effort to take you behind the scenes of politics and hear some of the funny—and occasionally outright bizarre—situations that happen on the campaign trail. Since Wilkinson has been covering politics for more than 40 years, he has plenty of stories to tell. To mark the one-year anniversary of his column, we are republishing Wilkinson's first-ever "Tales from the Trail" here today.  

The Trump administration has reversed a years-long decline in immigration arrests in Ohio and Michigan, sweeping up people previously considered lower priority for deportation, according to government figures and interviews with attorneys.

TNT

George Clooney the crazy prankster, the Oscar-winning actor, the social activist, the generous coworker and the loving father and husband are celebrated when the American Film Institute presents its 46th Life Achievement Award broadcast Thursday June 21 (10-11:30 p.m., TNT).

john mccain
Gage Skidmore / Flickr Creative Commons

Here's another story that ought to convince you that John McCain is not your typical politician.

You've seen his work in everything from Time magazine to MAD magazine, and from the New York Times Book Review to Boys Life.

Maybe you've bought his illustrated version of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Tom Sawyer," or seen his larger-than-life Joe Nuxhall waving to kids at Fairfield's Joe Nuxhall Miracle League Fields.

Artist C.F. Payne will talk about his 40-year career, and display some sketch books, at a free screening of "C.F. Payne: An American Illustrator" 6 p.m. Thursday at the Cincinnati Art Museum.

person listening to headphones
Philippe Put / Flickr Creative Commons

Soon, we might not be able to believe our own ears.

New technologies for creating faked audio are evolving quickly in the era of active information campaigns and their use of "fake news."

Jim Nolan / WVXU

Last week, Tales from the Trail introduced you to some famous eateries that have become must-stops for candidates running for office in Ohio – from candidates for county offices to the presidency. There are so many such places in Ohio, dishing out chili, piergoies, ice cream, hot dogs and hamburgers that we felt a "part two" was needed. And, in fact, there are so many, that Tales From the Trail may revisit the subject in the future. Here are some more dining spots that make up the political map of Ohio:

Price Hill Chili, Cincinnati

Scott Suchman / PBS

Former President Barak Obama will be David Letterman's guest on the premiere of Dave's comeback interview show premiering Friday Jan. 12 on Netflix.

Jim Nolan / WVXU

When you are on the road with a presidential candidate, campaign press aides will promise you the moon and stars to make you happy.

They promise to make sure you are fed, that you have plenty of time to file your stories, that you will have dependable transportation to get from one event to another.

They may even promise you some quality time with the candidate.

After a while, though, you learn to take these promises with a grain of salt.

NBCUniversal

Jerry Seinfeld's “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee" is on the move -- from Sony's Crackle streaming service to Netflix late this year, Variety says.

Provided by Comedy Central

If you’re recording Jon Stewart’s last “The Daily Show” at 11 p.m. Thursday, set the DVR for an hour. Comedy Central’s schedule plans for at least a 50-minute farewell for Stewart, who’s leaving the show after 16 years.

Before Stewart says goodbye, Comedy Central will air a 12-hour marathon Thursday, starting with a repeat of Monday’s show with Amy Schumer (10:28 a.m. Thursday) and Tuesday’s show with Denis Leary (11:01 a.m.).

The reruns shows with Steve Carell (1:17 p.m.), Newt Gingrich (4:38 p.m.), Bill O’Reilly (5:38 p.m.), President Barack Obama (7:20 p.m.) and a special called “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart: News Your Own Adventure” (8:56 p.m.). 

Provided by Comedy Central

Call him a comedian, call him a political satirist, call him an unabashed liberal. But to me, Jon Stewart is arguably the most influential comedian of our time.

Stewart leaves “The Daily Show” (11 p.m., Comedy Central) Thursday after 16 years with 19 Emmys for his blistering satires and holding politicians accountable. He turned a late-night comedy show originally hosted by former ESPN anchor Craig Kilborn (1996-98) into Must See TV, skewering politicians on the right and left. He wasn’t afraid to argue with President Barack Obama, members of congress or political commentators.

Here’s his final guest list:

Provided by Rep. John Boehner's office

House Speaker John Boehner is known for getting emotional. But even on the Golf Channel?

In an interview with David Feherty at 10 p.m. Monday on “Feherty,” the West Chester Township Republican gets misty – he calls them “Boehner moments” -- talking about his golf idol Jack Nicklaus, military veterans and opportunities for young Americans.

Provided

Among the hundreds of thousands of Americans who will gather Monday on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. to witness the swearing-in of President Obama to a second term will be many from our area.

Michael Keating

While Democrats in Washington are attending the inaugural balls on January 21, Cincinnati area Democrats will be holding their own celebration of President Obama's inauguration at a downtown bar.

Cincy's on Sixth, at the corner of East Sixth and Walnut streets, will be the scene of a $20-a-head "Partiers for Obama" inauguration party, beginning at 7 p.m. on Monday, January 21 - seven hours after President Obama is sworn in for a second term on the west steps of the U.S. Capitol.

More Ohio voters approve than disapprove of Ohio Gov. John Kasich's job performance, but they are still not convinced he should be re-elected in 2014, according to a Quinnipiac University Poll released Tuesday.

Ohio's 18 members of the Electoral College - all pledged to vote for President Obama and Vice President Biden - meet at noon Monday at the Statehouse in Columbus to do their duty.

Lists of 18 electors were submitted by both political parties before the election. Since Obama won Ohio on Nov. 6 with 50.7 percent of the vote, the 18 people submitted by the Democrats will take their seats in the Ohio Senate chamber Monday. 

Are you headed to Washington, D.C. in January for President Obama’s inauguration?


If so, 91.7 WVXU would like to hear from you.


We are planning a series on local people who are making the trip – either on their own or in groups. We’d like to share your stories of why you are going, what your plans are for Washington, and once you get there, we’d like to follow up with you on your experience.


We are hoping that many of you will be willing to share your photographs from the inauguration on wvxu.org and on ok our Facebook page.

Ohio Democrats will hunker down in Washington for next month's presidential inauguration at one of the city's most luxurious and historic hotels - the Renaissance Mayflower Hotel on Connecticut Avenue NW.

If you want to go along for the fun, there's a rather hefty price tag.

According to an e-mail sent out by the Ohio Democratic Party, the "Mayflower Package" costs $4,200 per person.

Members of Ohio Action Now, a coalition of pro-Obama groups and individuals, plans a Friday rally near Republican congressman Steve Chabot's downtown office to urge him to support President Obama's plans to raise taxes on Americans making over $250,000 a year.

Chabot opposes Obama's plan.

Ohio Action Now leaders say they will present a report from Innovation Ohio, one of their member groups, that they say will show flaws in the budget proposal from House Speaker John Boehner.

Now that the votes are officially counted, it’s time to empty the notebook on the 2012 election and turn the page. Here are  some parting thoughts:


Big Blue: One of the enduring myths of American politics, if you talk to many pundits and politicos around the country, is that Cincinnati is rock-solid Republican country.


Maybe they confuse the city with the county and the region as a whole, which definitely has a red due. Or maybe it goes back to the fact that the Taft political dynasty came from the Queen City.

Former Hamilton County commissioner David Pepper will join activists from a pro-Obama coalition in Roselawn Saturday to push for an end to Bush-era  tax cuts on those making over $250,000 a year.

The only relatively close ballot issue in Hamilton County in the Nov. 6 election - Issue 4, which sets Cincinnati city council terms at four years instead of two - picked up votes in the official vote count released this morning and passed easily.

President Obama, too, picked up votes and widened his lead over Republican Mitt Romney in Hamilton County.

When all the provisional ballots and overseas and military ballots were added, Issue 4 passed with 51.4 percent of the vote. The unofficial election night total had the issue passing with 51 percent.

Ohio Democrats were feeling pretty good Wednesday morning, once the votes had been tallied Tuesday night.
 

They managed to edge out a win in the Buckeye State for President Obama – 50.18 percent of the unofficial vote count for Obama, 48.18 percent for Mitt Romney.


And they managed to get Ohio’s Democratic senator, Sherrod Brown, re-elected over Republican challenger Josh Mandel, despite an avalanche of Super PAC money blanketing the state with TV ads trying to tear Brown down.

Four years ago, politicos on both sides were stunned when the formerly rock-solid Hamilton County was won by Barack Obama by a margin of 29,683 votes, taking 54 percent of the county to 46 percent for GOP nominee John McCain.

This year, the GOP and the Romney-Ryan campaign rolled the dice on winning back Hamilton County, one of the handful of linchpin counties that can make or break a presidential campaign in Ohio.

Again, though, they lost.

The race between President Obama and GOP nominee Mitt Romney in the key battleground state of Ohio is a toss-up, according to the final Ohio Poll released Monday morning by the University of Cincinnati's Institute for Policy Research.

The poll had support for Obama at 50 percent, while Romney's support stood at 48.5 percent. Another 1.5 percent of those polled said they would vote for another candidate.

Electing Mitt Romney would be a return to policies that have failed in the past and “crashed our economy,’’ President Obama told a full house crowd of 13,500 at the University of Cincinnati’s Fifth Third Arena Sunday night.

The highly charged-up crowd, that was entertained before and after the president’s speech by legendary recording artist Stevie Wonder, roared its approval when Obama appealed to them to help him win the election that takes place on Tuesday and appears now to be too close to call.

Here we go again.


We’ve seen this movie before.
 

Eight years ago on election night, President George W. Bush was sweating it out in the White House, watching states turn red or blue in what was obviously to be a close race with Democrat John Kerry.


Ohio’s returns kept going back and forth – Kerry in the lead, then Bush, then Kerry again.
The Bush team was sweating bullets. It was going to come down to Ohio.


Finally, late into the night – Ohio was called for Bush.

The Obama-Biden campaign is sending seven-time Grammy winner will.i.am and actress-producer Vivica A. Fox to Cincinnati Saturday for a "Party at the Polls" event outside the Hamilton County Board of Elections.

"Party at the Polls" begins at 10 a.m. outside the board of elections at 824 Broadway downtown.

The board offices will be open from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday for early voters, as well as from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday and 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. on Monday.

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