book club

Kathy Wiechman: Empty Places

Sep 3, 2016

Empty Places by Kathy Wiechman is a beautifully-written and deeply-felt coming-of-age novel set in 1932's Harlan County, Kentucky, where times are tough in the mining community.

Ruta Sepetys: Salt to the Sea

Sep 3, 2016

  World War II is drawing to a close in East Prussia and thousands of refugees are on a desperate trek toward freedom.

Salt to the Sea by Ruta Sepetys is the tale of three desperate passengers, forced by circumstance to unite, find their strength, and fight to survive.

Kurt Dinan: Don't Get Caught

Sep 3, 2016

  Oceans 11 meets The Breakfast Club in Don't Get Caught, an entertaining, fast-paced debut by Kurt Dinan filled with pranks and cons that will keep readers on their toes, never sure who's pulling the strings or what's coming next. Let the prank war begin!

Off The Shelf: September 3, 2016

Sep 2, 2016

Here are the books you heard about on the September 3 edition of Off The Shelf:

Kristina McMorris: The Edge of Lost

Aug 27, 2016

  In The Edge of Lost, Kristina McMorris weaves together two stories, from two continenets and two generations, to deliver a compelling novel. As her characters discover the true nature of loyalty, sacrifice, and betrayal, they are forced to confront the lies we tell in order to survive.

Dana Gunders: Waste Free Kitchen Handbook

Aug 27, 2016

  From Dana Gunders, a scientist at the Natural Resources Defense Council, comes Waste-Free Kitchen Handbook: A Guide to Eating Well and Saving Money By Wasting Less Food - the ultimate tool for reducing food waste.

David Bell: Since She Went Away

Aug 27, 2016

  From David Bell, bestselling author of Somebody I Used to Know and Cemetery Girl, comes Since She Went Away a chilling novel of guilt, regret, and a past which refuses to die.

Off The Shelf: August 27, 2016

Aug 26, 2016

  Here are the books you heard about on the August 27 edition of Off The Shelf:

  1. At Bobby Trivette's Grave, by Donna Vitucci
  2. Rise of the Rocket Girls: The Women Who Propelled Us, from Missiles to the Moon to Mars, by Nathalia Holt
  3. The Innocent Have Nothing to Fear, by Stuart Stevens

Off The Shelf: August 27, 2016

Aug 26, 2016

Here are the books you heard about on the August 20 edition of Off The Shelf:

Off The Shelf: August 20, 2016

Aug 19, 2016

  Here are the books you heard about on the August 20 edition of Off The Shelf:

  Great food and art belong together and Cincinnati certainly enjoys both in abundance. That is why Maria Kalomenidou and Cincinnati's Contemporary Art Center has enlisted the talents of the city's finest chefs and mixologists to create Cuisine Art Cocktails, a coffee-table cookbook unlike any other.

Stephanie Danler: Sweetbitter

Aug 19, 2016

Set amid the nonstop and purely adrenalized world of the New York City restaurant, Stephanie Danler's novel Sweetbitter is ultimately about the power of what remains after disillusionment, and the wisdom that comes from experience.

Off The Shelf: August 13, 2016

Aug 12, 2016

  Here are the books you heard about on the August 13 edition of Off The Shelf:

  1. Helping Children Succeed: What Works and Why, by Paul Tough
  2. 100 Days of Cake, by Shari Goldhagen
  3. Fly Me to Fairbanks: Love in the Last Frontier, by Michela Miller Ferree

Rich Cohen: The Sun & The Moon & The Rolling Stones

Aug 12, 2016

  Rich Cohen’s chronicle, The Sun & The Moon & The Rolling Stones, is informed by the rigorous views of a kid who grew up on the music and for whom the Stones will always be the greatest rock ’n’ roll band of all time.

Andrew Matheson: Sick On You

Aug 5, 2016

  Though directly inspiring the likes of Malcolm McLaren, the Sex Pistols, and the Clash - the Hollywood Brats imploded too soon to share in the glory of the 1970s London punk scene.

Sick On You by Andrew Matheson is a startling, funny, and incredibly entertaining period memoir about never quite achieving success despite flying so close to greatness.

Cara Mangini: The Vegetable Butcher

Aug 5, 2016

  The skills of butchery meet the world of fresh produce in Cara Mangini's The Vegetable Butcher, an essential, inspiring guide that demystifies the world of vegetables.

Ryan North: Romeo and/or Juliet

Aug 5, 2016

  What if Romeo never met Juliet?
What if they teamed up to take over Verona with robot suits?

In Romeo and/or Juliet: A Chooseable-Path Adventure by Ryan North, you choose where the story goes every time you read!

Mark Beauregard: The Whale - A Love Story

Jul 29, 2016

  Mark Beauregard's The Whale: A Love Story is a rich and captivating novel set amid the witty, high-spirited literary society of 1850s New England, offering a new window on Herman Melville’s emotionally charged relationship with Nathaniel Hawthorne and how it transformed his masterpiece, Moby-Dick.

Daryl Weber: Brand Seduction

Jul 29, 2016

  In Brand Seduction, Daryl Weber reveals the latest psychological and neuroscientific discoveries about how our minds process brand information and make decisions, and the important roles our emotions and unconscious play in our selections.

Marta McDowell: All the Presidents' Gardens

Jul 29, 2016

  Marta McDowell's All the Presidents' Gardens tells the untold history of the White House Grounds, starting with the seed-collecting, plant-obsessed George Washington and ending with Michelle Obama's kitchen garden.

Mary Kay Carson: Park Scientists

Jul 25, 2016

Park Scientists: Gila Monsters, Geysers, and Grizzly Bears in America's Own Backyard by Mary Kay Carson and Tom Uhlman highlights the researchers who work in America's National Parks, and who are able to perform long-term studies of a wide number of subjects from salamanders the size of thumbnails to gigantic geothermal geysers. 

Off The Shelf: July 23, 2016

Jul 22, 2016

Here are the books you heard about on the July 23 edition of Off The Shelf:

  1. Kate Hattemer’s The Land of 10,000 Madonnas
  2. Robert D. Putnam’s Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis
  3. Robert P. Watson’s The Nazi Titanic

Sari Wilson: Girl Through Glass

Jul 22, 2016

  An enthralling literary debut, Girl Through Glass by Sari Wilson tells the story of a young girl’s coming of age in the cutthroat world of New York City ballet—a story of obsession and the quest for perfection, trust and betrayal, beauty and lost innocence.

  A journalist and essayist of remarkable perception and prescience, Andrew Solomon’s Far and Away is a collection of writings about places undergoing seismic shifts—political, cultural, and spiritual.

James Bone: The Curse of Beauty

Jul 15, 2016

  She was the first American movie star ever to appear naked in a film, but her promising film career collapsed, her doctor fell in love with her and killed his own wife, and on her fortieth birthday, her mother committed her to an insane asylum. She remained there until her death in 1996 at the age of 104 and is now buried in an unmarked grave.

From James Bone, the former New York Bureau Chief of The Times of London, The Curse of Beauty reveals the riveting truth of the forgotten life of Audrey Munson, America's First Supermodel. 

Linda Kass: Tasa's Song

Jul 15, 2016

  From a peaceful village in eastern Poland to a partitioned post-war Vienna, Tasa’s Song by Linda Kass celebrates the bonds of love, the power of memory, the solace of music, and the enduring strength of the human spirit.

Gary Belsky & Neil Fine: On the Origins of Sports

Jul 15, 2016

  On the Origins of Sports by Gary Belsky & Neil Fine is an illustrated book built around the original rules of 21 of the world’s most popular sports, from football and soccer to wrestling and mixed martial arts.

Off The Shelf: July 9, 2016

Jul 9, 2016

  Here are the books you heard about on the July 9 edition of Off The Shelf:

  1. Joyce Goldstein’s The New Mediterranean Jewish Table
  2. Brian Murphy’s 81 Days Below Zero
  3. Elaine Showalter’s The Civil Wars of Julia Ward Howe

Francine Jay: The Joy of Less

Jul 8, 2016

  The Joy of Less by Francine Jay is a refreshing and relatable approach to decluttering that belongs in every home.

Michael Pollan: The Omnivore's Dilemma

Jul 8, 2016

  What should we have for dinner? Ten years ago, Michael Pollan confronted us with this seemingly simple question and ten years later, The Omnivore’s Dilemma continues to transform the way Americans think about the politics, perils, and pleasures of eating.

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