Brett Kavanaugh

U.S. Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky says Brett Kavanaugh “absolutely” still has his support. 

The Bowling Green Republican says he thinks the U.S. Supreme Court nominee will be confirmed in the next week or so, despite accusations that he sexually assaulted a young woman when he was in high school. 

Paul told WKU Public Radio on Thursday evening that he thinks it’s a mistake to discredit Kavanaugh’s personal life and career based on accusations.

"I think we should be judged on the totality of our life. He's been married for 25 years, he's a good husband and father, he's been a judge for 12 years," Paul commented. "I think we shouldn't discount that when someone comes forward with an accusation from 35 years ago."

Rob Portman Defends Brett Kavanaugh, Blames Democrats

Sep 19, 2018

With confirmation hearings delayed, Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio) offered a defense of U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh amid a claim of sexual assault.

Sen. Rob Portman will be among the bipartisan team introducing Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh as the Senate Judiciary Committee begins confirmation hearings tomorrow.

WATCH: Brett Kavanaugh Questioning

Sep 4, 2018
brett kavanaugh confirmation hearings
Andrew Harnik / AP

After a sometimes raucous day of opening statements on Tuesday, Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is facing his first round of questioning from Senators on Wednesday. Members of the Senate Judiciary Committee want to know about Kavanaugh's position on a range of issues including abortion, healthcare and presidential power. The nominee also faces questions about his time working in the Bush administration and his time working under independent counsel Ken Starr.

The confirmation of a Supreme Court justice is often a major event that ripples through American law for decades. But Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation hearing, which opens Tuesday, is especially historic because, if confirmed, Kavanaugh is expected to solidify a hard-right majority on the nation's highest court, a majority the likes of which has not been seen since the early 1930s, and which is likely to dominate for a generation or more.

Updated at 5:22 p.m ET

Confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh opened on a contentious note Tuesday, with Senate Democrats raising noisy objections that much of Kavanaugh's lengthy paper trail is still off limits.

The hearing proceeded despite Democrats' call for delay. Republicans, who control the Senate, hope to confirm Kavanaugh in time to join the high court when its fall term begins next month, cementing a 5-4 conservative majority.

Results in state primary races Tuesday show the continued unpredictability of the November midterm elections.

Ohio’s two U.S. Senators met with U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh ahead of what are likely to be heated Senate confirmation hearings.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Sen. Rand Paul is throwing his support behind President Trump’s Supreme Court pick, Brett Kavanaugh, after initially saying he wasn’t sure he would vote to confirm the nominee.

rand paul
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Rand Paul could represent the deciding vote on whether to confirm President Trump’s recent nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court, Brett Kavanaugh.

Cliff Owen / AP

"Solid choice." "As right-wing as they come." "Clearly qualified." "Serious concerns."

Those are the words Brad Wenstrup (R-OH), Aftab Pureval (D-Hamilton County), Rob Portman (R-OH) and Sherrod Brown (D-OH), respectively, used to describe their reaction to President Donald Trump’s choice of Brett Kavanaugh to replace Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, who is retiring later this month. So depending on what side of the aisle you fall on, you're either ecstatic or terrified.