Cincinnati politics

fc cincinnati mls
Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Raise your hand if you ever, for a second, believed that FC Cincinnati really wanted to put a soccer stadium in the cramped quarters of Oakley.

OK, now raise your hand if you believed in the fairytale of sticking a Major League Soccer (MLS) stadium in the middle of Newport. FC Kentucky, anyone?

Harry Black
Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Updated 3:15 p.m.

The unprecedented stand-off in Cincinnati City Hall continues over whether Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black stays or goes.

Conflicting Accounts On Whether Harry Black Will Vacate Position As City Manager

Mar 13, 2018
harry black
Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Mayor John Cranley announced late Tuesday that City Manager Harry Black will vacate his post within the week.  But Black released a statement later stating "no decision" had been made.

Jim Nolan/WVXU

 

Each Friday on Cincinnati Edition we present an in-depth discussion of the developments behind the headlines. This week we'll get an update on the review of taxpayer money spent by the Center for Closing the Health Gap and hear details from the state audit of the Cincinnati Parks Department. We'll also take a look at bills coming out of the Kentucky General Assembly, the top stories in Northern Kentucky, and college basketball.

Center for Closing the Health Gap

The Center for Closing the Health Gap was created in 2004 to help improve the health of the poor and uninsured in Cincinnati through education, training and community outreach. Over the last decade the city has provided almost $3.8 million in funding to the nonprofit.  

cincinnati edition
Jim Nolan / WVXU

Each Friday on Cincinnati Edition we present an in-depth discussion of the developments behind the headlines.

Jim Nolan/WVXU

  

Each Friday on Cincinnati Edition we present an in-depth discussion of the developments behind the headlines.

This is a big year for politics, nationwide, and here at home, from the Hamilton County Commission race to the race for the White House.

Flickr

Yesterday the voters had their say, rejecting legalized marijuana in Ohio and the park levy in Cincinnati, and electing a Republican as governor of Kentucky.  Join us for a look at Tuesday’s election results.

Provided, City of Cincinnati

  


  Cincinnati has a new set of leaders, with voters choosing John Cranley as their next mayor, and electing three new members to city council. Assistant Director for Philosophy, Politics, and the Public Honors Program at Xavier University, Dr.

  Cincinnati voters had their say on Tuesday, we get a rundown on the winners and losers in yesterday’s races from Howard Wilkinson and Jay Hanselman.

With less than a month left to persuade voters, Roxanne Qualls and John Cranley are each making their final push to become Cincinnati’s next mayor. We hear what each candidate has to say, on the streetcar, parking lease plan, balancing the city’s budget, and other issues that will determine the outcome of this election.

Charter Committee of Greater Cincinnati

In 1924 local corruption was so bad that Cincinnati earned the reputation as the worst-governed city in America. In June of that year, a new reform-minded group called the City Charter Committee was founded. Today that group is known as the Charter Committee of Greater Cincinnati. Mary Fitzpatrick, former board member, and Executive Committee Chairman Michael Goldman discuss the history and mission of the Charter Committee.

City of Cincinnati

Tuesday’s primary election left just two candidates in the race to be Cincinnati’s next mayor. We discuss each candidate’s campaigns and their chance of success in the November general election with Xavier University Assistant Director for Philosophy, Politics, and the Public Honors, Dr. Gene Beaupre, and XU Associate Professor of Political Science and Sociology, Dr. Mack D. Mariani. We also take a look at how the race for city council is shaping up.

People in Cincinnati have different opinions as to what goes on inside Cincinnati’s City Hall, but most would agree, it’s rarely boring. On today's Cincinnati Edition, a look at the upcoming races for mayor and city council.

Michael Keating

Howard Wilkinson's weekly political chat for June 10, 2013.

One could hardly find two political figures whose beliefs are more far apart than Ken Blackwell and Jerry Springer.


Blackwell, the conservative Republican and believer in limited government and the power of the private sector.


Springer, the liberal Democrat, who went on from a career in Cincinnati politics and TV news to become an internationally known talk show host, and a liberal Democrat who believes that government is not the enemy but the friend of those trying to their lives.


Both come from vastly different backgrounds.