Cincinnati Reds

WVXU

Congrats to my coworkers (especially Tana Weingartner) at WVXU-FM, who won first place for "Best Newscast" at the Ohio Associated Press Awards presented Sunday in Columbus.

Weingartner also brought home three awards. Here's the scoop from WVXU's Kevin Reynolds:

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Electronic waste, or E-waste (monitors, computers, cell phones and other electronic devices)– represents 2-percent of America's trash in landfills, but it equals 70-percent of overall toxic waste. And worldwide, 20 to 50 million metric tons of electronic devices are disposed of each year.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Opening Day is Cincinnati's favorite, unofficial holiday.

Topps Co. Inc.

Needing starting pitching – sound familiar? – the Reds signed former St. Xavier High School lefty Chris Welsh 30 years ago, on April 4, 1986.

The future Reds TV analyst was 30 when released by Texas the previous November, after compiling a 16-22 record in four seasons for the Padres, Expos and Rangers.

Welsh pitched one season for the Reds, his fifth and final season.

Oriental Wok's Facebook page

Oriental Wok's 40 foot limo is one of the newest entries in this year's Findlay Market Opening Day Parade. It caught the attention of parade organizer Debbie Gannaway of Gramma Debbie's Kitchen. "They have the Chinese Music Society joining them so there will be dancers in dragon costumes." Not to mention the banging drums.

There are 191 entries, down from 210 last year, according to Gannaway. "Well, we were trying to get it down to 175 but some people just came up with some really good stuff so we let them in."

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Ed. note: WVXU's politics reporter, Howard Wilkinson, is a life-long Reds fan. The following is his personal take on what Reds fans can expect from their ball club in 2016. 

Whether the team has won World Series rings the year before or finished dead last in the National League Central Division, Opening Day in Cincinnati is a very special day.

It is a day of celebration; the first day of summer in the true baseball fan's calendar.

WXIX-TV

Fox 19's Tricia Macke, retired radio personality Jim Scott, and new Reds  General Manager Dick Williams will be part of Fox Sports Ohio's Opening Day telecast Monday.

For the first time, FSO will simulcast the parade on a local over-the-air TV station (WXIX-TV), in addition to sharing the game with a local TV broadcaster.

The Reds-Phillies game again will air at 4 p.m. on WKRC-TV (Channel 12), plus sister Sinclair station WRGT-TV (Channel 45) in Dayton.

Mark Heyne

Cincinnati's unofficial holiday, Opening Day for the Reds, is just one week away. Many fans will no-doubt start celebrating early, but the official festivities begin at noon next Monday with the 97th annual Findlay Market Opening Day Parade, featuring former Reds manager Lou Piniella as grand marshal.

MLB.com

Reds General Manager Dick Williams didn't take the traditional career path to running a professional baseball team. For years he was an investment banker and venture capitalist. In the ten years Williams has worked for the Reds he's taken a closer look at what baseball calls sabermetrics. (SABR-Society for American Baseball Research)

Wikipedia

From his rookie debut with Hank Aaron’s Atlanta Braves, to his Baker Family Wines in California, MLB Network profiles former Reds manager Dusty Baker at 9 p.m. Tuesday.

Aaron, his mentor, is a major player in “MLB Presents: Dusty: A Baseball Journey.” Baker was on deck when Aaron broke Babe Ruth’s home record in 1974.

“The year I went through chasing the record, I think that really helped him get to where he is today,” Aaron says in the show.

John Kiesewetter

Producers of the documentary about the Big Red Machine “Great 8” are “exploring a few different options” after failing to fund the film on Kickstarter, the online crowd-funding site.

Only $19,580 was pledged toward the $500,000 goal during a 51-day on-line campaign, which ended Jan. 15. Just 79 people offered financial support for the “GR8.” Under Kickstarter rules, the producers do not get any money, because the goal was not met.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Update 2:20 p.m.:

Reds legend Pete Rose thanked Major League Baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred for the opportunity to be inducted into the Reds Hall of Fame.  “Regardless of what you may have read, or what you believe in, I got along with the commissioner.  He was a great guy. He didn’t rule the way I wanted him to rule, but that’s life. For him to go out of his way to let us do this, I pat him on the back,” Rose says.

Joseph Kiesewetter

Six weeks before the first spring training game,  Marty Brennaman remains uncertain whether this year will be his last as Reds Radio announcer.

Brennaman, 73, is starting the final year of his contract, his 43rd year in the Reds Radio booth.

“I’ll be back in 2016. And after that I don’t know what I’m going to do. I’m conflicted,” Brennaman said at the sold-out Joe Nuxhall Memorial Sports Stag in Hamilton, presented by Knights of Columbus Father Butler Council 968.

Michael E. Keating

Wednesday, after Ken Griffey Jr. sat in his home outside Orlando, surrounded by family, TV cameras and some writers who had covered him over the years, took the call on his smart phone, the one telling him he had been elected to Baseball’s Hall of Fame.

It is a call that baseball fans from Seattle to Cincinnati and everywhere in between had been anticipating ever since he made his major league debut at the age of 19, fresh out of Moeller High School.

    

After a long battle with cancer, Reds Hall of Fame pitcher Jim O'Toole passed away Saturday at the age of 78. 

The left-handed starter was a mainstay of the Reds' rotation in the 1960s; and the Chicago native stayed in Cincinnati after his pitching career, where he and his wife raised 11 children. 

In March, WVXU's Howard Wilkinson recorded an appreciation of O'Toole for Around Cincinnati when he was named Grand Marshal of Cincinnati's 2015 St. Patrick's Day parade. You can listen to it here. 

Former Cincinnati Reds pitcher Jim O’Toole has been named Honorary Grand Marshall for Cincinnati’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade. Our Howard Wilkinson talks about Jim O’Toole: the character, competitor and storyteller.

CBS Television

Not only did David Letterman love Cincinnati’s “Paul Dixon Show,” he was a huge fan of Dixon’s sidekicks Colleen Sharp Murray and Bonnie Lou.

And I have the proof.

Going through my Letterman files recently, I found a note Dave sent me in 1998 referencing Bonnie Lou, the vocalist from WLWT-TV’s “Dixon” and “Midwestern Hayride” who died earlier this month at age 91. Lee Hay will air a one-hour tribute to Bonnie Lou at 11 p.m. Saturday in place of the weekly “Blues” show.

Food Network

After finishing second Sunday on “Cutthroat Kitchen,” Great American Ball Park executive chef James Major returns to Food Network 8 p.m. Thursday for the “Chopped: Impossible” finals.

Major, a former U.S. Navy cook -- and two other “Chopped” champs who won over the last three weeks -- will compete for $15,000 and a chance to go one-on-one in the kitchen against Robert Irvine, a “Chopped: Impossible” judge and and star of the network's "Restaurant Impossible."

Cincinnati Reds

The Cincinnati Reds are naming Dick Williams as the club's new Senior Vice President and General Manager. Walt Jockety is staying with the team as President of Baseball Operations.

Food Network

Not just a home run, but an inside-the-park home run. That’s how Great American Ball Park executive chef James Major advanced to the “Chopped: Impossible” finals airing 8 p.m. Nov. 12 on Food Network.

Judge Geoffrey Zakarian called Major’s walnut and balsamic sponge cake with peanut butter cream “a well done dessert, an inside-the-park home run.”

The “Chopped: Impossible” contestants had to concoct a dessert using a meat lover’s sub sandwich, ostrich egg, chunky peanut butter and balsamic vinegar.

Major also will compete on "Cutthroat Kitchen" 10 p.m. Sunday on the Food Network in an episode called "The Hunt For Bread October," says Michael Anderson, Reds public relations manager.  

Food Network

Can he do it again?

Great American Ball Park executive chef James Major, who won a special “Chopped” competition for baseball park chefs last year, appears on the Food Network’s “Chopped: Impossible” at 8 p.m. Thursday.

Major, who attended the Culinary Institute of America, is competing against 11 other “Chopped” champs in the four-part tournament, says Michael Anderson, Reds public relations manager.

The winner receives $15,000 and a face-off with Robert Irvine, the “Restaurant: Impossible” star and “Chopped: Impossible” judge.

Kansas City Royals

Game 2 of the World Series is Wednesday with the  Kansas City Royals up one after winning 5-4 in 14 innings Tuesday night.  The Royals say they have the pieces to go all the way against the New York Mets. 

The biggest splash was when the Royals picked up pitcher Johnny Cueto in a trade with the Cincinnati Reds last July; and he will be on the mound for Kansas City tonight.

Wikipedia

Score it Error: Ferrell. Or #FarrellFail.

Comedian Will Ferrell’s HBO special Saturday about playing all nine positions for Major League Baseball teams last March was a colossal disappointment.

“Ferrell Takes The Field, available on HBO the rest the month, features the “Anchorman” and former “Saturday Night Live” star playing for 10 teams – including the Reds – in a marathon March day in Arizona.

Unfortunately, Ferrell fixated on the misguided concept of staying in character – as a 47-year-old man who believed he had the talent to play in the big leagues. To me, the hour was filled with far too much phony  bluster and braggadocio, and artificial angst about being traded or released, as he bounced from club to club.

Wikipedia

 On this date in TV Kiese History…

Aug. 26, 1939:  The Cincinnati Reds played the Brooklyn Dodgers in the first televised Major League Baseball game seen by the few people with TV sets in the New York City area 76 years ago today.

Red Barber, who started his professional sports announcing career doing Reds radio for Crosley Broadcasting’s WLW-AM and WSAI-M, broadcast the game on NBC’s experimental TV station W2XBS.

During the game from Ebbets Field, Barber also did the first TV commercial -- for Procter & Gamble’s Ivory Soap.

Provided / Hamilton County Commission

The replacement of seats at Great American Ball Park earlier this year came in under budget. That's in part because the project made a little money. 

Wikipedia

Comedian Will Ferrell’s stint as a Cincinnati Reds third baseman – part of his marathon day playing every position for 10 teams during spring training – debuts on HBO 10 p.m. Sept. 12.

“Ferrell Takes The Field” was filmed at five Arizona ball parks on March 12 as a one-hour special from Funny or Die, in partnership with Major League Baseball.

John Kiesewetter

As he celebrates his 73rd birthday today, Marty Brennaman sounds as excited as that rookie big league radio announcer who joined Joe Nuxhall in 1974. That’s what made Marty a Hall of Famer.

Reds fans will say he’s best known for his calls of the 1990 World Series, Jay Bruce’s Central Division clinching homer in 2010, or Pete Rose’s hit number 4,192, but to me Marty’s at his best when the Reds are at their worst.  Just listen. Marty and Jeff Brantley or Jim Kelch keep fans laughing and engaged through this awful season. 

Here’s how to see the Home Run Derby and All-Star Game, all the live national TV specials from Great American Ball Park, Reds features on Fox Sports Ohio, and TV appearances by Barry Larkin, Johnny Bench, Pete Rose and more baseball stars today and Tuesday.

Rose will be on “MLB Whiparound – All-Star Game at the Park” live 5-6 p.m. Monday and Tuesday on Fox Sports 1 cable from Great American Ball Park. He’ll join Joe Buck and Hall of Famer Frank Thomas on the “Fox All-Star Pregame Show” 7 p.m. Tuesday on Fox (Channel 19), before going on the field when Fox airs the “Franchise Four” and four “Greatest Living Players” during the pregame ceremony.

Here’s how to see all the baseball fun on TV:

Starters for the All-Star Game were announced Sunday and the full player rosters came out Monday. Now it’s time to play ball, as Cincinnati hosts the 86th Major League Baseball All-Star Game. 

Cincinnati Reds

Once every generation or so, Major League Baseball chooses Cincinnati to host its All-Star Game, the “mid-summer classic” that brings together the best players in one ball park.

When the first pitch is thrown Tuesday night from the Great American Ball Park mound by the National League starter, it will be the fifth time Cincinnati has hosted the All-Star Game since it began at Chicago’s Comiskey Park in 1933 and the first in the ball park that has been the Cincinnati Reds’ home since 2003.

All-Star Game specials, Reds retrospectives, repeats of the 1975 World Series, a two-hour Pete Rose interview and a nightly “All-Star Live” show will fill Fox Sports Ohio July 6-16.

“All-Star Live” debuts at 6 p.m. Monday on FSO, prior to the “Reds Live” pregame show. Starting Thursday, “All-Star Live” and the “Reds Live” pregame and postgame shows will be telecast from Major League Baseball’s FanFest at the Duke Energy Center downtown.

Other highlights include five “Spotlight” shows on Reds history; a replay of the 1988 All-Star Game from Riverfront Stadium; a 30-minute film about the 1970 All-Star Game at Riverfront; highlight films from the 1990, 1975  and 1976 World Series; and four entire games from the Big Red Machine’s 1975 World Series victory over the Boston Red Sox.  The details:

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