drinking water

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Imagine this: You're outside a bar on Main Street in Over-the-Rhine. A friend's boyfriend has stepped outside to smoke. He finishes the cigarette, and maybe there isn't an ashtray or a bucket nearby, and so he tosses it into the street.

Or, try this scenario: You're at home with one of those "flushable" wipes. You're done with it, so, you flush it.

U. S. Air Force

Scientists have long known treated wastewater is safe to drink but how does it taste when compared to "conventional" groundwater and bottled water?

Wikimedia Commons

The water crisis in Flint, Michigan last year raised awareness of the severe health damage caused by the lack of clean water. And while most communities in the Unites States take clean water for granted, according to a government Indian Health Service report, about 7.5 percent of Native American and Alaska Native homes did not have safe drinking water or basic sanitation as of 2013.

WVXU

The Greater Cincinnati Water Works recently sent letters to more than 16,000 property owners letting them know their homes and businesses may be getting water through a lead service line.  

Jeff Swertfeger with Water Works says the city is replacing lines when doing other work.

WVXU

Cincinnati officials estimate that some 16,000 private properties are still getting water through lead lined pipes.  

The city will soon be notifying those owners in writing about the issue. Council approved a motion Wednesday for such notifications.  

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

A harmful blue-green algae bloom is still plaguing the Ohio River, and a Kentucky biologist says it doesn't look like that will change soon.