flooding

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Many people associate Harsha Lake at East Fork State Park in Clermont County with boating and recreation. While those activities are important, that's not the reason it was built.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Cincinnati officials are declaring a state of emergency as flood cleanup begins, but it's not a bad thing.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Updated 5:10 p.m.

Hamilton County disaster officials are still trying to get a handle on the scope of flood damage this week. The Ohio River was still above 59 feet, Monday afternoon, which puts it in moderate flood stage.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

There isn't a flood damage estimate for Hamilton County yet. Emergency Management Agency officials haven't been able to start counting the number of properties affected by high water, or the cost of repairing properties and infrastructure. The water is still too high.

Bill Rinehart

The National Weather Service forecasts the Ohio River at Cincinnati to crest Sunday afternoon at 60.6 feet. Flood stage is 52 feet.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Update from the National Weather Service 8:21 a.m. Feb. 25:

Latest forecast for the Ohio River at Cincinnati has a crest occurring this afternoon at approximately 60.6 ft. Current stage is nearing 60 ft. After the crest this afternoon, levels should begin going back down.

Ohio River under a bridge
Bill Rinehart / WVXU

The National Weather Service predicts the Ohio River at Cincinnati will reach 59.5' by Tuesday, a level the river hasn't seen since the flood of 1997.

Storm Water Management Utility / City of Cincinnati

Some Cincinnati council members have questions about a proposal to increase storm water rates. The storm water utility wants a $5.3 million increase in 2018 and 2019.  

Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black has formed an internal task force to review the implications of the increasing number of severe weather events in the city.

Newport Floodwall Rated Unacceptable By Army Corps

Apr 19, 2017
Bill Rinehart / WVXU

A patch of land on the Newport levee system has been slowly sliding toward the Ohio River. Newport City Manager Tom Fromme and the Army Corps of Engineers say it's not a major problem. But, the entire floodwall system has other problems the Corps says need to be fixed.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Part of the Newport floodwall has slipped but the city manager says it's nothing to worry about. Tom Fromme says the patch of hillside between the Taylor Southgate bridge and the Licking River started to slide a few months ago, but has become more visible recently.

Bill Dattilo / Provided

The Metropolitan Sewer District is being asked to buy several homes on the west side because of flooding and sewer backups.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

On the evening of August 28, 2016, central Hamilton County received nearly 4.5 inches of rain in a very short time. The storm sewer system wasn't built to handle that kind of rainfall and water and sewage backed up into some homes and businesses in Norwood, St. Bernard, and several Cincinnati neighborhoods.

This week twenty years ago our region experienced one of the worst floods in modern history. While river communities in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana suffered, the hardest hit was the city of Falmouth, Kentucky

Ann Thompson / WVXU

People affected by Sunday's flash flooding can turn to several different agencies for help, and those organizations are working together. Larry Shields with St. Vincent De Paul says it's a team effort.

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Heavy rains and flooding caught Norwood and St. Bernard residents off guard Sunday night, with one man telling WVXU Monday, the city must have "ticked off Mother Nature."

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Cincinnati received a record amount of rain Sunday.  National Weather Service Meteorologist Brian Haines says the old record for December 27 was set more than 100 years ago.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

While receding flood waters are leaving behind plenty of mud and debris, causing big clean-ups along the Ohio, work on Cincinnati's Smale Riverfront Park isn't being affected.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Seasonal flooding comes as no surprise to Tristate officials, who have ordered a handful of road closures, and are preparing to close more as the Ohio River rises.  And the flooding has shined a spotlight on the relative isolation of a pair of Hamilton County communities.

River levels around Hamilton County are already high, and with more rain today and tomorrow, the sheriff's office and county engineer are preparing to close more roads.  Parts of Four Mile, Eight Mile, Debolt and Kellogg had water standing on them earlier this week.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

**Updated March 9**

The Ohio River crested at 53 feet, Sunday, according to the Associated Press.  That's one foot above flood stage.  The river level is expected to fall slowly through the rest of the week.  The National Weather Service is predicting rain on Tuesday, and again Thursday and Friday.

**Original story** 

With plenty of rain and snow this week, area rivers are expected to rise quickly.

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