Issue 1

The state budget office is saying that if Issue 1 passes this fall, it will cost local communities more money for a variety of reasons. That’s a main reason why the issue, which is intended to divert money from incarceration into treatment in many cases, has drawn opposition from groups representing cities and counties. 

As groupsassociations, and individual polticians around Ohio line up against a statewide ballot issue to cut jail time for some drug offenders, one group remains steadfast in their support.

The Ohio State Coroners Association has come out adamantly against the only issue on the statewide ballot, saying they can’t be for any measure that makes it more difficult to prosecute drug dealers and traffickers. 

Gov. John Kasich says he’ll do what many of his fellow Republicans say they’ll do this fall when it comes to the statewide ballot issue that would change criminal sentencing to prefer treatment over prison time. 

The panel that decides the wording of statewide ballot issues has agreed on the language for the only one voters will see this fall.  It’s a resolution to a dispute over Issue 1, which supporters say will prioritize treatment over prison for drug offenders, but opponents say will make communities more dangerous.

Opponents are fighting back against a statewide ballot measure that would reduce the penalties for drug offenders. Under Issue 1, minor drug-related offenses would not require prison time, prioritizing treatment instead. Critics say that sets a dangerous precedent.

Issue 1, the proposed redistricting plan, continues to rack up support ahead of its appearance on the May ballot. Although backers are optimistic it will pass, they’re not putting all of their eggs in this election’s basket.

Campaigns Ramp Up As Election Day Nears

Nov 3, 2017
Jim Nolan/WVXU

 

Candidates for Cincinnati mayor and city council make their final push before Tuesday's election as supporters and opponents of Ohio Issues 1 and 2 ramp up their campaigns.

Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Many Ohioans know there’s a marijuana legalization issue on the ballot – but most don’t know there’s an issue to change the way state lawmakers’ districts are drawn.

Statehouse correspondent Karen Kasler reports on attempts to change that.