Jim Renacci

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with New Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about President Trump's scheduled appearance at the Ohio Republican Party's annual dinner in Columbus. Trump's visit could end up being used as a tool to motivate both Republican voters and Democrats to go the polls in November. 

mike pence
Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Vice President Mike Pence, in front of an audience of about 400 ardent supporters of his boss, President Trump, at a downtown Cincinnati hotel ballroom, spent an hour talking about a trilogy of ideas that all made his listeners very happy.

donald trump jim renacci
Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP

Here's what you have to do sometimes when you are covering politics.

You have to drag yourself to some boring old parlor at a downtown hotel early on a Tuesday morning so you can witness a politician – in this case, GOP Senate candidate Jim Renacci – sign his name to two big pieces of cardboard.

jim renacci cincinnati
Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Republican U.S. Senate candidate Jim Renacci held a press conference and mini-rally of supporters at a downtown Cincinnati hotel Tuesday morning where he tried a ploy that was used against his Democrat incumbent Sherrod Brown six years ago.

sherrod brown
John Beagle / Flickr Creative Commons

Does the Ohio Republican Party have reason to be worried about November's statewide election?

Yes. Yes, they do. They can read the tea leaves and they are no fools.

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about how polling and some fundraising numbers have Ohio Democrats feeling good about their chances of winning some state offices that have been under Republican control for many years. There are no guarantees, but the Democrats are cautiously optimistic. 

Master Sgt. Bob Barko Jr. / Youngstown Air Force

Many general election contests start out with TV ads that make you feel warm and fuzzy. Bluebirds chirping in the trees. The candidate, rolling around the front yard, playing with the family dog, the grandkids or both.

But not this Ohio Senate race between Democratic incumbent Sherrod Brown and Republican challenger Jim Renacci.

The Republican candidate for US Senate is firing back at an ad from the Democratic incumbent with an ad of his own. This campaign was expected to be expensive, and now it’s certain to be nasty as well.

Ohio’s Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown opened his fall re-election bid Friday with an attack against his Republican rival, U.S. Rep. Jim Renacci, over the Congressman's period as a registered lobbyist.

Jim Renacci
M.L. Schultze / WKSU

Ohio’s U.S. Senate race this fall is expected to be one of the most expensive in the country and to have Donald Trump’s name all over it. As soon as Republican Congressman Jim Renacci was declared the winner of the GOP nomination last night, the battle against Democratic incumbent Sherrod Brown began.

The Ohio Democratic Party will soon announce its fifth debate with its four major candidates for governor. But it’s starting to look like there won’t be one between the Republican candidates for that office.

As recently as six weeks ago, Jim Renacci, the Republican congressman from Wadsworth in northeast Ohio, was gung-ho about running for governor of the state of Ohio, making speeches about how an "outsider" like him could come in and fix what's broken in Columbus.

Then, state treasurer Josh Mandel sent shock waves throughout Republican circles in Ohio and dropped out of the U.S. Senate race, which, if he had won the primary, would have been a rematch of his losing campaign in 2012 against Democratic incumbent Sherrod Brown.

We're not here to say that the pairing of U.S. Rep. Jim Renacci and Cincinnati council member Amy Murray is not going to work.  

Howard Wilkinson / WVXU

Updated 1 p.m.

Republican Cincinnati council member Amy Murray is teaming up with gubernatorial candidate Jim Renacci as his running mate.

We hope you are sitting down while reading this, because this is astounding news:

Republicans running for governor in Ohio have more money than Democrats running for governor. Way more.

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WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the four likely Republican candidates for Ohio governor and the impact that President Trump could have on the race. 

If you are a Republican who wants to be elected the next governor of Ohio in 2018, you may be scratching your head over what to do about the man sitting in the White House, President Trump.

Do you run and cling to his side through next Spring's primary election, hoping that enough of those 2,841,005 Ohioans who voted for Trump for president last November will fall into your lap?