Ohio News

A conservative think tank is responding to a new report urging the state to invest in clean energy, saying the industry is evolving and could be a good investment, but that doesn’t mean it needs to be propped up by government. 

States across the political spectrum have turned recently to a new kind of gun control measure, known as red flag laws or extreme risk protection orders. They allow for the seizure of guns from potentially dangerous people.

A Dayton artist is working on a new way to memorialize victims of the nation’s devastating opioid epidemic.

The project would create a memorial wall made of hand-cut mosaic tiles, called the  “Wall of Perseverance.”

The memorial is the brainchild of mosaic artist Jes McMillan, founder of the Mosaic Institute of Greater Dayton

Advocates for low-income Ohioans continue what they are calling the “Poor People’s Protest.” And this latest one at the Statehouse culminated with some activists being removed from the premises without a struggle.

There still aren’t any voting sessions scheduled in the Ohio House this week. But the leader of majority Republicans has put forward a new way to end the impasse. Backers of the representative who’s had the most support are calling for a vote now.

Any day now, the U.S. Supreme Court may decide a case that could change how Ohio removes people from voter rolls. The court heard arguments in Husted v. A. Philip Randolph Institute in January. 

Federal law lays out a process for taking people’s names off the registered voter list if they have moved to a new address and haven’t updated election officials.

A study is urging Ohio leaders and policymakers to support clean and alternative energy now before it’s too late. One researcher says there’s a ticking clock on the economic benefit the state could harness. 

A statewide committee that’s been looking at military base realignment during the past year has made some recommendations. 

A new Stanford University analysis of state and national test scores shows more Ohio students pass state exams than similar nationwide tests, which researchers say means the state’s proficiency standards are too low.

The analysis by Stanford’s Hoover Institution looks at NAEP scores, or the National Assessment of Educational Progress.

The NAEP test is given to a nationally representative sample of fourth and eighth graders and is the only exam that allows the country to compare the academic progress of students across states. 

A crackdown on payday lenders that lawmakers haven’t passed is a step closer to going before voters next year.

There is no official action scheduled in the Ohio House today. Over the holiday weekend there was talk, but little change in the saga over who will be the Speaker till the end of the year - with the acting Speaker saying he’s willing to stay on and the representative with the most votes saying no deal.

The recent US Supreme Court ruling striking down a federal ban on sports betting means Pennsylvania can go forward with sports wagering through a law passed last year, in anticipation of the court’s decision. But there’s one anti-gambling activist who says he thinks Ohio will be open for sports gambling in a matter of weeks – or maybe days.

Communities throughout the state are holding memorial events this weekend to remember those who have lost their lives while serving their country. A wreath was laid at the Veteran’s Plaza at the Ohio Statehouse. Ohio Public Radio’s Jo Ingles produced this audio portrait of Governor Kasich’s annual wreath-laying ceremony.

A group that advocates for the rights of landowners is fighting back against a bill that would allow for more wind turbines to pop up. The bill addresses how far turbines can set back from property lines. But the wind energy industry says those setbacks must be reduced in order for more development. 

Gov. John Kasich has signed an executive order that will emphasize the use of technology to assist disabled Ohioans when the state evaluates their needs. 

Accusations are flying at the State Capitol as the Ohio House continues in disorder without a speaker. The lawmaker considered to be the frontrunner says his rivals, such as the payday lending industry, are pulling the strings to delay a vote. But a top lending association is mounting its own, major accusation.

The state is moving mental health and addiction services for low income Ohioans into Medicaid managed care by July 1, but providers say this huge redesign is straining their finances and could shut them down. But a key lawmaker involved in legislation relating to this redesign says it’s unlikely to be delayed.

This week marked the second in a row without a voting session in the Ohio House. All sessions were canceled because majority Republicans cannot decide on a leader to replace former House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger. He resigned in April and is embroiled in an FBI investigation involving his associations with payday lending lobbyists. 

Dayton City Commissioners unanimously passed an ordinance effectively banning panhandling along many major roadways in Dayton. 

The new law prohibits pedestrians from coming within three feet of an operating vehicle on 51 busy roadways in the city. It would also penalize motorists who slow down or deviate from traffic lanes to interact with pedestrians.

The House Republican lawmaker acting as the top leader has once again called off the vote for a new speaker. That disorder of not having a speaker in charge is making its way into policymaking.

Ohio House sessions for this week have, once again, been cancelled due to controversy over who will be the next speaker. The fight that’s been brewing among majority Republicans in the House Is now affecting the business of the legislature - and is quickly becoming a campaign issue.

A crowd of graduates and their families at Harvard University welcomed Gov. John Kasich to Cambridge with loud applause after, during his introduction, it was noted that the former Republican presidential candidate did not vote for Pres. Donald Trump.

Kasich didn’t offer words of advice during his commencement address at the Kennedy School of Government Wednesday, but instead told graduates not to count on people like him to make change.

As another attempt among Republicans to pick a Speaker of the Ohio House has stalled, there’s been some action in the hometown of the former Speaker. And it’s likely connected to reports of an FBI inquiry into Cliff Rosenberger’s travel with lobbyists connected to the payday lending industry. 

Voters approved an overhaul of the way Ohio’s Congressional district map will be drawn in the future. But a lawsuit has been filed in federal court against the current map, which opponents say is a result of partisan gerrymandering. 

The latest school shooting in Texas has activists are calling on younger people to register to vote and cast ballots in the upcoming midterm elections. But historical stats show those calls may go ignored in Ohio. 

It’s been over a week now since the Ohio House Republican Caucus failed to come up with enough votes to name a new speaker to take over for the rest of this year. House leaders say they hope to do that tomorrow.  The pressure is mounting for majority lawmakers to pick a leader soon.

"Without a speaker, the House is essentially rudderless and that is making the ability for anybody to get any type of public policy accomplished difficult to impossible." - Keith Lake, Ohio Chamber of Commerce

A community group is moving forward with their attempt to put a measure on the ballot that would crack down on payday lending. They say they’re tired of waiting for lawmakers who are still struggling to pick a speaker -- so they can act on the bill. 

The City of Dayton is activating traffic cameras at two more sites Monday. A total of five intersections within city limits are now camera monitored.

Red-light cameras have officially been activated at the intersections of James H. McGee Blvd and Third Street and Linden Avenue and Smithville Rd. Violators will be issued warnings for the first 30 days after activation. After that, $85 citations will be issued by mail.

Speed cameras are already operating at three other city intersections:

(Editor's update: Politifact graded this ad "mostly false" on May 31.)

The tone of the US Senate race between incumbent Democrat Sherrod Brown and Republican Congressman Jim Renacci may have been set by the very first ad, which ends its short run on broadcast and cable TV around the state today.

1.3 million retired unionized workers are facing a growing crisis surrounding underfunded pensions. And with 60,000 of those in Ohio, it’s sure to be an issue in the campaign for US Senate. And the incumbent has a proposal he wants to see passed by the end of the year.

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