Rob Braun

WKRC-TV

Deb Dixon's first TV dream never came true. Thank goodness for that. She switched majors at Baldwin Wallace College in the early 1970s from sociology to communications because she wanted to host a children's TV show.

Instead she became one of Cincinnati television's best crime reporters, and one of our top TV storytellers, in her 44 years at WKRC-TV. After anchorman Nick Clooney left Channel 12, Dixon became the heart and soul of the newsroom, breaking the biggest crime news, giving hugs and support to her coworkers, and carrying on the spirit of her mentor Clooney.

WKRC / Provided

Did that Sinclair news commentary in March about media companies pushing "their own personal bias and agenda" read by anchors Rob Braun and Cammy Dierking hurt WKRC-TV's May sweeps news ratings?

Maybe. 

sinclair broadcasting
Deadspin / YouTube

Editor's note: The opinions expressed in this article are the author's and do not necessarily reflect the views of WVXU. 

So you're a long-time loyal Channel 12 viewer, and you're weren't happy seeing anchors Rob Braun and Cammy Dierking forced to read a corporate-mandated complaint from owner Sinclair Broadcast Group about media outlets which "push their  own personal bias and agenda, to control exactly what people think."

WKRC-TV

News anchor Rob Braun said in a WKRC-TV staff meeting Wednesday that he's been getting death threats after Channel 12 started airing a statement by owners Sinclair Broadcast Group complaining about media companies pushing "their own personal bias and agenda."

sinclair broadcasting
Deadspin / YouTube

It was hard to miss the corporate-mandated complaint about "the troubling trend of irresponsible, one-side news stories plaguing our country" last week on Local 12, and Sinclair Broadcast Group's 172 other TV stations nationwide.

Rob Braun and Cammy Dierking read the Sinclair-ordered script in the first 10 minutes of every newscast (which I clocked at 80 seconds), cutting into news time.

WLWT-TV

Commercial television in Cincinnati turns 70 on Friday, Feb. 9, when WLWT-TV started commercial operation in 1948 – Cincinnati's first television.

Crosley Broadcasting had been experimenting with television for nearly a year with W8XCT. WLWT-TV was the city's only TV station for 14 months, until Taft Broadcasting's WKRC-TV signed on in April 1949. WCPO-TV followed in July 1949.

WKRC-TV

First things first: No, Cammy Dierking has not been let go, or demoted, or left WKRC-TV.

WEWS-TV

WKRC-TV viewers will see a female meteorologist on "Good Morning Cincinnati" next month, but she's not who you might expect.

Channel 12 hired morning meteorologist Tera Blake from Cleveland's WEWS-TV Monday to do mornings newscasts with John Lomax, Bob Herzog and Sheila Gray. Evening meteorologist Erica Collura had been seen on "Good Morning Cincinnati" in late October.

WEBN-FM

If you're not heading to the Ohio River banks Sunday, here are the broadcasting plans for the Western & Southern/WEBN Fireworks on WEBN-FM (102.7) and WKRC-TV (Channel 12).

WEBN-FM will celebrate its 40th annual fireworks with Rozzi’s Famous Fireworks choreographed to a "40 years of fireworks themed soundtrack" on the radio station, WEBN-FM announced in July.

The fireworks will air at 9:05 p.m. Sunday.

Provided by WLWT-TV

WLWT-TV premieres the city’s third 10 p.m. newscast on Jan. 11 by pre-empting “Hogan’s Heroes” on sister Me TV Channel 5.2.

Promos aired during the Bengals-Broncos game Monday night on Channel 5 featured news anchor Sheree Paolello, meteorologist Kevin Robinson and sports director George Vogel. That’s three-fourths of the 11 p.m. team who will do half-hour newscasts at 10 p.m., says Richard Dyer, Channel 5 president and general manager. All are Cincinnati natives.

Why not main co-anchor Mike Dardis, who came to Channel 5 from Seattle in 2012?

The station which started the first weekday 7 p.m. local newscast here in 1979 returns to the time period with “9 On Your Side at 7PM” Sept. 14.

WCPO-TV anchor Julie Dolan and chief meteorologist Steve Raleigh will provide “fast-paced news of the day and Cincinnati’s 9 First Warning Forecast,” the station announced. The half-hour program also “will feature in-depth news stories integrating digital journalism from WCPO.com.”

It will be the only local newscast at 7 p.m. But not the first.