tariffs

Kentucky soybean farmers are struggling with uncertainty and loss of income because of tariffs imposed by China, in retaliation for President Donald Trump’s tariffs on Chinese products coming into the U.S. 

The impact of the escalating trade war between the U.S. and China began reverberating on Kentucky soybean farms about three months ago. The uncertainty hit the soybean market even before China’s 25 percent tariff on U.S. soybeans went into effect in July.

Jed Clark is vice chairman of the Kentucky Soybean Board. He farms 1,100 acres of soybeans in Graves County and said he’s seen the value of his crop decrease in the past few months because of the Chinese tariffs.

Ohio Farmers Brace For Escalating Trade War

Aug 9, 2018

The trade war that's already squeezing Ohio farmers is ratcheting up another notch.

In response to the Trump administration announcing $16 billion in new tariffs against China on Tuesday, Chinese trade officials on Wednesday promised to retaliate with their own tariffs.

Ohio U.S. Sen. Rob Portman would like to see an end to trade disputes with China, but the Republican senator said President Donald Trump’s decision to provide $12 billion in subsidies to American farmers might be a good short-term solution to trade shortfalls. 

The escalating trade war has hurt many Ohio farmers producing soybeans, pork, and corn, among other products.

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The head of Kentucky’s bourbon association says he’s worried that a drawn-out trade war could slow down growth of the state’s signature distilling industry.

Kentucky bourbon is in the crosshairs of retaliatory tariffs from the European Union, Mexico and Canada after President Trump’s decision to impose tariffs on steel and aluminum from those countries.

Ohio U.S. Sen. Rob Portman says he’s concerned about the escalating trade dispute with Canada. And the Republican says he disagrees with the Trump administration’s reasoning for higher tariffs on Canadian goods. 

Portman, who served as U.S. trade representative in the Bush administration, says he’s concerned that the Trump tariffs on Canadian steel and other products will boomerang, ultimately hurting U.S. workers and getting in the way of a better North American Free Trade Agreement. He also rejects the administration’s rationale for imposing the tariffs.

Ohio’s Sen. Rob Portman, who was the U.S. trade representative for the George W. Bush administration, is expressing concern over the steel and aluminum tariffs President Trump plans to impose on Canada

Regional iron and steel industry leaders say they are disappointed by the Trump administration’s delay on a decision about which countries will face new import tariffs. President Trump has postponed until June a decision on which countries will be subject to new tariffs on steel and aluminum imports. The decision had been due May 1.

Nucor Corporation CEO and president John Ferriola was among the steel and iron industry representatives who discussed the delay in a press briefing on Tuesday. Nucor has facilities in Kentucky and Ohio. Ferriola said the delay is disappointing because it gives other countries more time to undercut domestic producers with unfairly priced goods, a practice known as dumping.


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President Trump's proposed tariffs on 1,300 Chinese products and his Twitter feud with Amazon roiled the stock market. Congress and the White House prepare for a series of confirmation hearings on Trump's Cabinet nominations. And the president announces plans to deploy the military to the U.S.-Mexico border to confront what he calls a growing threat of illegal immigrants.

Ohio farmers are pushing back against the Trump administration after China made good on promises to respond to recent U.S. tariffs with tariffs of its own.