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How Anti-Drug Campaigns Like 'This Is Your Brain On Drugs' Have And Haven't Worked

A still image from a 1998 ad in which a young woman first holds up an egg, then a frying pan: "This is your brain. This is heroin." She then smashes the egg with the fying pan, and the shattered egg drips onto the kitchen counter. "This is what happens to your brain after snorting heroin. This is what your body goes through." (AP Photo)
A still image from a 1998 ad in which a young woman first holds up an egg, then a frying pan: "This is your brain. This is heroin." She then smashes the egg with the fying pan, and the shattered egg drips onto the kitchen counter. "This is what happens to your brain after snorting heroin. This is what your body goes through." (AP Photo)

President Trump has said he wants to launch a new anti-drug ad campaign to fight opioid use. But how have these public service announcements worked in the past?

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Keith Humphreys (@KeithNHumphreys), professor of psychiatry at Stanford University and former senior policy adviser for the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy under Presidents Bush and Obama.

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