Politics

Political news

Former Cincinnati city council member and vice mayor Jim Tarbell is running as a write-in candidate for county commissioner against Republican incumbent Chris Monzel.

Tarbell filed the required form and paid an $80 fee today to become a write-in candidate, according to Sally Krisel, deputy director of the Hamilton County Board of Elections.

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about what is like to be a high profile race this fall because of the names involved - the race for Hamilton County probate judge.

Something is likely to happen in this year’s November election in Hamilton County that is pretty much unheard of.

The most competitive race in the county might be the race for the open seat of Hamilton County Probate Court judge.

There are others that might generate some fairly fierce competition, but there is nothing quite like the probate court race.

Ohiohistorycentral.org

For 160 years, Ohio has had a public school system. Now, an appointed panel of lawmakers, former public officials and well-connected experts are examining how the Ohio constitution can resolve the debate over how to pay for it. The group is called the Constitutional Modernization Commission.  It could dramatically change language dealing with public education.

Ohiohistorycentral.org

After years of complaints about the way the Ohio's Congressional and Statehouse districts are drawn, an appointed panel of current and former lawmakers and other officials is looking over a plan to change it. In the second of a three part series on the issues in front of the Constitutional Modernization Commission, there’s still a lot of debate over whether that plan is fair and politically balanced.

It’s hard to find anyone around Capitol Square who doesn’t think the current process for redistricting doesn’t need to be tweaked or even completely overhauled. 

OhioHistoryCentral.org

For months, an appointed panel of lawmakers, former public officials and well-connected experts has been meeting to talk about what should be changed in the Ohio Constitution.  Term Limits is one of teh items on the agenda. 

Of all the major issues on the commission’s agenda, it appears the first big move will come in the form of term limit expansion.

WVXU political reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about the Ohio governor's race and the recent problems of Democratic candidate Ed FitzGerald; and how he is trying to get his campaign back on track.

Is the ship sinking for Ohio Democrats in the governor’s race?

Democratic Party leaders insist that it is not, but there is no question that the ship has been taking on water at an alarming rate in the past few weeks.

And the fear among some Democrats is that if their candidate for governor, Ed FitzGerald, sinks under the waves, he might take the Democrats’ down-ticket statewide candidates – for attorney general, secretary of state, treasurer, and auditor – down to the bottom of the deep blue sea with him.

Sean Patrick Feeney said this afternoon he has rejected attempts by Democratic Party leaders to get him to step aside in the Hamilton County commission race for former mayor Charlie Luken.

"I'm committed to this; and I am going to continue on,'' said Feeney, a technology consultant who lives in North College Hill.

Earlier in the day, Hamilton County Democratic Party chairman Tim Burke said he wanted Feeney, a first-time candidate, to step aside so the Democrats could run former Cincinnati mayor Charlie Luken against Republican incumbent Chris Monzel.

An additional 11.2 mill tax levy for the Lockland Local School District went down to a resounding defeat in Tuesday’s election, while voters in the Lebanon City School district overwhelming passed a renewal tax levy.

In Mount Healthy, a renewal of a tax levy for fire and emergency medical service passed easily, with nearly 94 percent voting in favor of it. Voter turnout in Mount Healthy was about 6.5 percent.

In Lockland, nearly 64 percent of those who cast ballots voted “no” on the tax levy. The voter turnout in the Lockland District was about 15 percent.

WVXU's political reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with Ann Thompson about the likely confirmation of Harry Black as Cincinnati's 15th city manager this week.

  

It appears that, eight months into his term as Cincinnati’s mayor, John Cranley has found his soul mate.

Amid a flurry of media interviews and press conferences this past week, Cranley introduced his choice to become the city’s next city manager – 51-year-old Harry E. Black, who, for the past two-and-a-half years, has been the finance director of the city of Baltimore.

harry black
Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley has selected a new city manager. Mayor Cranley’s pick is Harry Black, who has been the finance director for the City of  Baltimore since early 2012. Mr. Black also served as Richmond, Virginia’s chief financial officer from 2005 to 2008. Howard Wilkinson sat down with Harry Black to talk about his move to Cincinnati.

Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Ed FitzGerald trails incumbent Republican John Kasich by 12 percentage points and is still not well known to about two-third of Ohio voters, according to an independent poll released this morning.

The Quinnipiac University Polling Institute, which polls voters in key states, has Kasich with 48 percent to FitzGerald’s 36 percent.

In May, Kasich led FitzGerald by 15 percentage points in the last Quinnipiac Poll.

Andy Chow

School districts have spent years preparing to implement the education standards known as Common Core -- which are set to start this coming school year. Now House Republicans are renewing their efforts to repeal the standards. The bill could be on the fast track to the House floor.

Republican Representative Andy Thompson of Marietta has been a vocal critic of the Common Core standards which were developed by a group of state education leaders from around the country.

WVXU political reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about the recently concluded National Urban League Conference in Cincinnati; and the two headline speakers - Vice President Joe Biden and Kentucky Senator Rand Paul.

There’s one thing you can say for certain about the small-government, libertarian-leaning junior senator from Kentucky, Rand Paul, who (presumably) would like to be the next president of the United States.

He doesn’t shy away from a tough crowd.

Paul did it last year when he made a speech before a somewhat less than receptive crowd at Howard University, the historically black college in Washington, D.C.

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