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'Nobody Is Safe': Native Afghani Living In Cincinnati Worries About His Family Still In The Country

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Mohammad Sami Ahmadzai
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Mohammad Sami Ahmadzai has been in Cincinnati with his family for the last five years but he is concerned about friends and relatives still in Afghanistan.

Twenty-year-old Mohammad Sami Ahmadzai is a Xavier University student who is closely watching the developments in Afghanistan.

The anxiety has ramped up for Mohammad Admadzai now that U.S forces have left Afghanistan and his sister and other relatives have yet to get out.

The 20-year-old Afghan student at Xavier University has lived in Cincinnati almost five years. He’s a graduate of Princeton High School.

“After the takeover of the Taliban it’s really dangerous for those people even evacuating those Afghans will not help with peace or anything,” he says.

Admadzai’s dad, who is also living in Cincinnati, was once a translator for the U.S. Army and knows people still trapped in the country who did the same thing.

“After the takeover by the Taliban nobody is safe," Admadzai says. "What the Taliban is trying to do is they’re trying to show their good side to the world to take over the country. After that, I think they’re going to do bad things.”

Admadzai says the Taliban is hunting down Afghans friendly to the U.S. and are going to kill them.

The Americans' last flight out of Kabul, which met President Joe Biden's Aug. 31 deadline for complete withdrawal of U.S. forces, was described as a historical moment by the Taliban.

"Congratulations to Afghanistan," the group's spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid told reporters at a news conference at the airport, NPR reports. "This victory belongs to us all."

President Biden will address the nation about ending America's longest war Tuesday at 2 p.m. WVXU will carry his remarks live on air and online.