Ambriehl Crutchfield

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Reporter

Ambriehl is a general assignment reporter with interest in education and communities. She works to amplify underrepresented voices and advance daily news stories. She comes to WVXU with previous reporting experience at NPR member stations WBEZ in Chicago and WKYU in Bowling Green, Kentucky.

Ambriehl Crutchfield / WVXU

"Al Gore was right."

"There is no Planet B."

"Climate inaction is genocide."

"We stand for all people and all nations."

WCPO

Longtime West End residents could be priced out of the neighborhood.

A new West End Housing study says household incomes and affordable rentals aren’t matching up, which creates a neighborhood ripe for displacement.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

If you see and hear first responder vehicles near Great American Ball Park at The Banks Thursday morning, don't panic. First responders are practicing how to respond in a mass casualty event like a natural disaster or terrorist attack.  

Ambriehl Crutchfield / WVXU

The Ohio Department of Education reports disadvantaged students in Cincinnati Public Schools are closing performance gaps.

Ambriehl Crutchfield / WVXU

Robert Medallion, 17, plays left and defensive tackle on Taft IT High School's varsity football team.

He's has been playing varsity at Taft for three years, but his connection to the old Stargel Stadium dates to his first little league game.

Ambriehl Crutchfield / WVXU

Some Cincinnatians are making a case for and against reparations for descendants of enslaved Africans.

During St. Peter's United Church of Christ's event "Race, Rage and Fear: The Case for Reparations - Yes, No, Maybe? Why or Why Not?," a group of churchgoers and community members broke into groups to discuss reparations.

Pixabay

The Hamilton County Office of Reentry is working to make sure people who have been convicted of crimes transition into the community seamlessly.

Ambriehl Crutchfield / WVXU

Fortune 500 companies, craft breweries and eateries tend to dominate business coverage of Cincinnati. But Essence magazine says the Queen City is the fastest growing economic power in the Midwest—in particular, minority businesses are booming, especially if you're black, the magazine says.

Ambriehl Crutchfield / WVXU

Planned Parenthood of Southwest Ohio will close two locations Sept. 20.

fifth third vigil
Jennifer Merritt / WVXU

This week marks the one-year memorial of the shooting at the Fifth Third Center in downtown Cincinnati.

After the events on Sept. 6, 2018, #CincyStrong became a trending topic locally and a rallying force for the city to get behind. Though Cincinnati has not experienced a mass shooting since (defined by the FBI as four or more murdered during an event), gun violence continues in the city. In urban communities like the West End, the conversation around it continues.

Pixabay

Updated: Thursday 10:22 a.m.

A new Cincinnati study shows low income and black children benefit the most from being in preschool.

Several local organizations partnered to review Cincinnati Public Schools Kindergarten Readiness Assessment - Literacy (KRA-L). Kindergartners take the KRA-L before November so teachers can assess and teach to the instructional level of students. The data follows students who took the test in 2004-05, 2005-06 and 2006-07 school years up until high school

Pixabay

Cincinnati Public Schools is rerouting yellow buses which will impact 11,000 riders.

In a press release the district says higher enrollment is increasing the demand for yellow bus service. The district says its projection was off by more than 600 students.

Pixabay

A Kentucky education agency wants to find new ways to attract high school students to attend college.

Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education, or CPE, is a government-funded agency that helps coordinate efforts with public universities and community colleges. CPE President Aaron Thompson is touring the state to hear from various stakeholders, including students.

Pixabay

Late drop off times, lack of communication and crammed school buses are at the heart of some parents' complaints about Cincinnati Public Schools' bus system.

"And once again it's all of the same answers," says Amy Waldfogle, whose daughter is a seventh grader at Spencer Center. "'There's rain; there's traffic; you don't understand; it'll work itself out." She says the reason things work themselves out is because parents quit using the bus system.

Ambriehl Crutchfield / WVXU

It's the Monday before Cincinnati Public Schools are back from summer break and Akshayaa Venkatakrishnan's classroom is bare.

The only personality the room has are two bumblebee decorations hanging from the ceiling.

Pixabay

At 9:00 a.m. on any given weekday, tenants are at the Hamilton County Municipal Court in eviction court pleading their case to a magistrate.

Ambriehl Crutchfield / WVXU

An eight-year-old Guatemalan boy is heading into his first day of American school in Cincinnati Monday. José has been in the U.S. since early July after a month's journey and staying in a detention camp.

Pixabay

The City of Cincinnati is dismissing all charges for 100 grams or less of marijuana.

Ambriehl Crutchfield / WVXU

People with disabilities are testing out new voting technology that will allow them to vote independently. A group of people got to test out the new technology Tuesday at Clovernook Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired.

Ambriehl Crutchfield / WVXU

Nickeisha Holloman's body was found on the side of the road in 2018. Her mother, Keiana Rogers, says her daughter's unsolved murder encouraged her to attend a gun violence rally Sunday in Lower Price Hill.

"It's hard to lose a child," she says. "A loss is a loss though. The bottom line is to try and prevent and try to create different programs to get our youth involved."

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