Jo Ingles

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record” and ONN’s “Capitol Square”. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service.

She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo also works as the Media Adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University Transcript newspaper and OWU radio.

The Christmas weather has been mostly mild this year but many Ohioans are still getting the chills. Public health leaders say the flu has hit the Buckeye State hard.

If you’ve driven Ohio’s roads lately, you’ve probably noticed the big signs with cheeky sayings directed at drivers. Here's why you are likely to see more of them in the future. 

There has been an increase in the number of deaths on Ohio's roads due to distracted driving. At least 51 more people have died already this year. That's why the Ohio Highway Patrol will be stepping up enforcement efforts on the state’s roads this holiday season.

21 bills were signed into law in Ohio in 2019, including the new $69-billion two-year budget, a controversial energy bill that reduced or eliminated clean energy standards and an abortion bill that was put on hold by a federal court before it could take effect.

The leader of the Ohio House says lawmakers are in a quandary when it comes to the death penalty. 

In the next five years, more than a quarter of Ohioans will be over the age of 60. And that’s a concern for first responders, as they’re more likely than ever to encounter a person with dementia. The symptoms of that condition can be misunderstood.  Now there's a new bill to deal with that. 

Nearly 75,000 Ohioans have registered with the state to receive medical marijuana. Of those, just over 51,000 have actually purchased the product. Those involved with the program propose some changes they say will improve it for everyone.

A small nativity, complete with a figure representing newborn Jesus, is on display at the Ohio Statehouse right now. And the private group and lawmakers who want it there say it’s perfectly constitutional.

Federal law mandates insurers treat mental health services like they would physical health care. But the sponsors of a new bill in the Ohio Legislature say that’s not happening. 

Republican U.S. Senator Rob Portman (R-Ohio) says progress is being made in Washington D.C. while two articles of impeachment against Republican President Donald Trump are being brought forward in the Democratic dominated U.S. House.

About 800,000 Ohioans take advantage of the homestead exemption credit that reduces their property tax burden. Now, a bill has been introduced that would reduce it even further for low-income and disabled veterans.

Ohio’s Secretary of State says 354 people who are not U.S. citizens registered to vote or actually cast ballots in 2018. And those people could potentially face charges. 

Some Ohioans, especially in rural or low-income areas, have been able to get basic dental care in mobile units. But the state doesn't regulate those. A new bill that would change that.

Ohio’s Secretary of State says a recent attempt by a computer in Panama to insert code into his office’s website was unsuccessful. But state leaders say this incident underscores why a comprehensive election security plan must be put in place soon.

Ohio lawmakers are considering a bill that would allow the state's education department to set health and sex education standards for K-12 schools.  But it is meeting opposition from conservative groups. 

The impeachment debate is drawing a big line between Republicans and Democrats. But the parties are working together on some bills. Ohio’s Republican and Democratic Senators talk about bipartisanship in a divided Washington D.C.

Opponents of the death penalty say they are concerned about a newly proposed abortion ban that could charge a woman who gets an abortion and a doctor who provides it with a capital crime. It would make abortion punishable by life in prison without the possibility of parole or death. 

An Ohio lawmaker who went to El Salvador recently on a fact-finding mission says her experience there is strengthening her resolve to fight abortion bans here at home. 

Ohio has a new weapon to detect bogus claims by the few people who try to scam the state for unemployment checks each year. 

Thanksgiving is a time when families come together but it can also be frustrating when members have different opinions on hot button political issues. The Ohio Legislature has provided plenty of fodder for uncomfortable conversations this year. Here are some of the topics that might come up faster than you can say "pass the turkey.”

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