Jo Ingles

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record” and ONN’s “Capitol Square”. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service.

She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo also works as the Media Adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University Transcript newspaper and OWU radio.

A bill that would have allowed an extension of benefits to unemployed Ohioans who are at risk or have medical conditions that could be deadly if they contract COVID-19 has been in the works at the Statehouse. But the sponsor of that legislation says it is not necessary now that Gov. Mike DeWine has issued an executive order.

Ohio’s constitution bans slavery except for one reason. And at least one Black lawmaker wants that exception stripped from the state’s governing document.

The Ohio Senate is being asked to consider a bill passed along party lines in the House that requires new reporting standards for COVID19. 

A group that wanted to put voter reforms such as guaranteed 28 days of early voting, same day registration and voting and automatic registration at the BMV on the fall ballot has dropped its effort. 

Voter turnout in Ohio has been around 70 percent in presidential election years, and elections officials think turnout will be high this year as well. But with lingering concerns related to the pandemic, they say it’s going to be important to get as many Ohioans as possible to vote early this November. 

Nearly one million Ohio households lack reliable broadband service and of that, there are 300,000 that don’t have any service at all. The Ohio House has passed a bill that would help bring broadband to those area. It’s now up to Senators to pass the plan.

A court in eastern Ohio has dismissed a case that brought criminal charges against the owner of a diner in Cambridge for failing to comply with rules set forth in the state’s reopening plan for restaurants. This was the outcome the state’s Attorney General had requested.

Lawmakers in an Ohio House committee rejected a proposed amendment that would have banned the sale and display of the Confederate flag at county fairs in Ohio.

As state lawmakers are asked to consider a resolution to declare racism a public health crisis, Ohio Senate leaders plan to hold meetings throughout the state to listen to the concerns of black Ohioans. Here's some of the issues Senate President Larry Obhof thinks might come up in those meetings.

Some Ohio lawmakers are pushing five different bills they say will deal with the state’s opioid abuse problem in a comprehensive way. 

Ohio has joined six other states in suing a pair of Texas-based businesses, saying they have blasted Ohioans with more than 59 million illegal robocalls offering extended car warranties and health care services. 

After more than a week of protests in Ohio cities that have spread to college campuses and smaller communities, protestors are taking their messages against racism and police brutality to individual movers and shakers. Here’s the latest from a demonstration in Columbus.

The owners of eight bars and restaurants in Northeast Ohio are suing Gov. Mike DeWine and Department of Health Director Amy Acton over rules put in place for restaurants to reopen following closure due to coronavirus. 

Ohio lawmakers are considering a bill that would allow restaurants and bars to sell liquor on Sundays without having to obtain a special permit. 

On a party line vote, an Ohio House committee has passed a bill that will make some changes to election law. Backers say it gives more flexibility to election officials should COVID-19 cause changes this November but its opponents have concerns.

Shortly after COVID19 shut down much of Ohio, Governor DeWine announced food stamp recipients would be allowed to use the drive-up grocery shopping service provided by many stores. Now, there’s another option available to those who want it.

Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose has formed a task force with local and statewide elections officials to prepare for the November election. He’s pushing legislation that would make changes for November but Democrats have their own bill to do that.

The leader of minority Democrats in the Ohio House says it’s time to take recommendations and reports on community policing off the shelf and put them in action. 

A member of Congress from Central Ohio was with two local officials and other protestors when she was hit with pepper spray at a protest in Columbus.

Gov. Mike DeWine has called the Ohio National Guard in to help with protests in Columbus. And the city's mayor, Andrew Ginther, has imposed a curfew beginning at 10 p.m. that will last until 6 a.m., which he says could be extended if warranted.

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