Jo Ingles

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record” and ONN’s “Capitol Square”. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service.

She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo also works as the Media Adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University Transcript newspaper and OWU radio.

New rules on speed and red-light cameras started this month, as the new transportation budget went into effect. But a community near Cincinnati that suspended its newly-created camera program after those new rules is now facing a lawsuit. 

A new Quinnipiac University poll shows a majority of Ohioans support background checks for gun sales, favor legalized abortion and oppose one of the most recent state restrictions on it. 

A new Quinnipiac University Poll shows Democratic Former Vice President Joe Biden is the only Democrat in the race who would beat Republican President Donald Trump if the election were held today.

A new Quinnipiac University Poll shows Democratic Former Vice President Joe Biden is the only Democrat in the race who would beat Republican President Donald Trump if the election were held today. 

Nearly two dozen groups and individuals are asking Ohio’s top elections official for a list of voters who could be dropped from the rolls this fall, so they can try to get them re-registered. 

The Trump administration wants to cut food stamp benefits for about three million Americans. 

The state department of transportation is testing out new technology aimed at stopping wrong way crashes on the highway. Signs and detectors are being installed along an 18-mile stretch of I-71 in the Cincinnati area.

Nearly three quarters of Ohio’s counties have received a “state of emergency” declaration because of severe weather last month. 

Ohio’s new budget is in place, after the House and Senate couldn’t agree and a temporary spending plan was passed. That means agencies can operate with certainty, knowing the amount of money they have to do the business of the state. But it doesn’t mean every item in the budget is in effect now. 

It looks like Ohio voters might get to vote on a proposed law that would expand background checks for firearm sales after all. A previous version of a petition was rejected last month.

It looks like Ohio voters might get to vote on a proposed law that would expand background checks for firearm sales after all. A previous version of a petition that would start the process of putting it on the ballot to begin had been rejected last month. 

Many of Gov. Mike DeWine’s 25 budget vetoes had to do with changes to Ohio’s Medicaid system. And part of that involves the two pharmacy benefit managers or PBMs the state uses as middlemen between Medicaid and pharmacists.

Ohio’s unemployment rate was down slightly in June. It was an even 4 percent last month compared to 4.1 percent in May. Companies in Ohio have jobs that are going unfilled right now.

Most of the attention on lawmakers has focused on their approval of a state budget 17 days after the deadline. But they also passed a bill to decriminalize hemp and license its cultivation. 

Ohio’s high school graduation requirements are changing, with a new set of recommendations for incoming freshmen made by a group of businesses, a charter schools organization and some public schools.

The law also allows the state to take over academically distressed school districts was put on hold. Both of those provisions are in the new two-year state budget approved by lawmakers.

The two year operating budget will move next year’s presidential primary to St. Patrick’s Day. Republicans had to move it to after March 15 so they could award all delegates to a single candidate.

Finally, Ohio has a new two-year operating budget.

Planned Parenthood of Greater Ohio is tapping into the national organization’s emergency funds to be able to provide birth control and other health care services to low income women. This move allows the organization to comply with a Trump administration order that bans federal dollars from going to clinics that refer clients for abortions. 

Finally, Ohio has a new two-year operating budget. Gov. Mike DeWine signed it into law this morning.

Plans to change the logo the state uses on handicap accessible signs have been put on hold. The transportation budget that just went into effect had required ODOT to use a new logo.

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