Jo Ingles

Jo Ingles is a professional journalist who covers politics and Ohio government for the Ohio Public Radio and Television for the Ohio Public Radio and Television Statehouse News Bureau. She reports on issues of importance to Ohioans including education, legislation, politics, and life and death issues such as capital punishment.

After working for more than a decade at WOSU-AM, Jo was hired by the Ohio Public Radio/TV News Bureau in 1999. Her work has been featured on national networks such as National Public Radio, Marketplace, the Great Lakes Radio Consortium and the BBC. She is often a guest on radio talk shows heard on Ohio’s public radio stations. In addition, she’s a regular guest on WOSU-TV’s “Columbus on the Record” and ONN’s “Capitol Square”. Jo also writes for respected publications such as Columbus Monthly and the Reuters News Service.

She has won many awards for her work across all of those platforms. She is currently the president of the Ohio Radio and TV Correspondent’s Association, a board member for the Ohio Legislative Correspondent’s Association and a board member for the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters. Jo also works as the Media Adviser for the Ohio Wesleyan University Transcript newspaper and OWU radio.

Non-essential businesses that were closed during the past month due to COVID-19 are now starting to reopen. But some worry that’s happening too quickly without proper safeguards.

Ohio’s retail businesses that were shut down as non-essential are being allowed to open Tuesday. And by the end of next week, many restaurants, bars and hair salons will also reopen. 

Ohio is among the top states for several agricultural crops and for food production and processing. But while farming is considered an essential business under the various shutdown orders, it's a tough time for those who run the state's 76,000 farms.

Brick and mortar retail stores throughout Ohio that have been considered non-essential are set to open on May 12th. But the newly expanded stay-at-home order is allowing some to start up tomorrow. 

Just under a quarter of Ohio’s registered voters actually cast ballots in the primary election which ended earlier this week. Low turnout was expected after the original March 17th in person Election Day was canceled because of coronavirus concerns, and absentee voting by mail was extended until this past Tuesday. And there are now calls for change to make it easier to vote this fall.

Today is the last day to cast a ballot in Ohio’s 2020 presidential primary. In person voting on March 17 was postponed and absentee voting was extended.

Dine in service at Ohio’s restaurants is not among the business that will resume in a few days. Restaurants are asking Gov. Mike DeWine to allow them to open mid-May.

A small private liberal arts university in Ohio that’s been in operation since 1850 is closing its doors at the end of spring semester. 

So much of what’s happening now in Ohio and for the foreseeable future is online, and that’s exposing some serious problems in broadband service across Ohio. Here's what state leaders are doing to help now and in the future.

A voting rights organization says there are potentially a lot fewer voters who will cast ballots this year compared to the presidential primary four years ago. The group looked at totals so far for the March 17 primary that has been extended to April 28.

The task force of state lawmakers meeting virtually to consider how businesses in Ohio should reopen following the COVID19 has been hearing testimony from leaders of companies and trade associations. But some on that bipartisan panel are concerned there’s a lack of diversity among those participating.

The Ohio National Guard’s Military Reserve soldiers have been helping out at food banks, but they are also collecting and distributing personal protective equipment to people who need it. 

Small business leaders throughout the state are telling a House panel looking at how to lift Ohio’s Stay Home order they need to allow businesses to open now. 


Most Ohioans will soon be getting a stimulus check as part of a federal aid bill signed into law last month. Banks and creditors might see this as an opportunity to collect. But, Ohio’s law enforcement chief is putting them on notice that they can’t touch that money.

The state has filed a lawsuit against a Cleveland-area man for hoarding personal protective equipment that is sorely needed by health care workers fighting coronavirus. 

Ohio has its first inmate death due to the coronavirus pandemic. Gov. Mike DeWine says an inmate at the Pickaway Correctional Institution has passed away. Last week, a corrections officer at the Marion Correctional Institution died from the illness.

Social distancing and the stay-at-home order have caused a lot of people to change their plans. But some tenacious Ohioans aren’t letting the pandemic get in their way. And they are getting creative about finding alternatives.  

Ohio restaurants have not been able to serve mixed drinks and straight liquors since the state order that closed dine-in services took effect last month. Now, the state is making a change to its rules that will allow restaurants to serve those drinks along with take-out meals. 

A panel of three federal court judges won’t get involved in a dispute over abortion and the state’s coronavirus order regarding elective surgery – which keeps facilities that perform abortions open for now. 

Gov. Mike DeWine and Ohio's top health leader say Ohioans should to wear homemade and non-medical grade masks when they go out in public.But wearing a mask doesn’t mean you can’t get coronavirus.

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