Planning Commission To Consider Hyde Park Zoning Study Friday

Sep 3, 2015

Credit Provided / City of Cincinnati

Update 9/4/15 @ 12:25pm:  The Cincinnati Planning Commission has rejected a proposal that could have slowed development activities in Hyde Park for several months.  

The commission voted unanimously Friday morning against a zoning study of the entire neighborhood, and implementing an interim development control overlay district, or IDC, during such a review.  That would have meant any project proposed after the overlay was established would have to go through extra scrutiny before moving forward. 

 

Original post: The Cincinnati Planning Commission is scheduled to vote Friday morning on a proposal that could slow development activities in Hyde Park for several months.  

City staff are recommending a zoning study of the entire neighborhood and implementing an interim development control overlay district, or IDC, during such a review.  

That means any project proposed after the overlay is established would have to go through extra scrutiny before moving forward.  

In a letter, city manager Harry Black says Mayor John Cranley and the Hyde Park Neighborhood Council requested the city study the impact recent demolitions and subdivisions have had on the neighborhood's character, quality of life and property values.  

"I am directing your department to conduct a zoning study to carry out the wishes of the mayor and the neighborhood," Black wrote in the letter to the city planning department.  "In conducting your study, you should consider planning, land use, and zoning solutions that address impacts that future demolitions and subdivisions may have on the neighborhood, including any adverse impacts on its aesthetics, character, quality of life and property values."

Some city representatives and residents are concerned other neighborhoods will make similar requests and that could overwhelm the limited resources of the planning department.

If the planning commission approves the zoning study and IDC, city council's neighborhoods committee would take up the issue and then the full council would have the final vote.