Spring Flooding Forecast And How COVID-19 Complicates It

May 7, 2020

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is expecting higher than usual temperatures across the country in the spring, along with above-average rainfall, some of which could be significant enough to trigger flood conditions amid already saturated soils.

That's according to a report published by NOAA.

"NOAA stands ready to provide timely and accurate forecasts and warnings throughout the spring," said Neil Jacobs, Ph.D., acting NOAA administrator, in the report. "The dedicated employees of the National Weather Service continue to apply their skills and the latest technology to monitor additional rainfall, rising river levels, and the threat of severe weather to keep the public ahead of any weather hazard."

Joining Cincinnati Edition to talk about the flood forecast is National Weather Service Ohio River Forecast Center Service Coordination Hydrologist Jim Noel.

Meanwhile, what happens when flooding occurs amid the COVID-19 pandemic?

The Union of Concerned Scientists published a report this spring detailing the intersection of potential flood threats and the pandemic. The analysis found that the areas of the U.S. facing both the highest infection rates and flooding risks tend to be rural America, where health facilities and the access to them may be more limited.

Joining Cincinnati Edition to talk about that are Union of Concerned Scientists Climate Vulnerability Social Scientist Juan Declet-Barreto and Senior Climate Scientist Kristy Dahl.

Listen to Cincinnati Edition live at noon M-F. Audio for this segment will be uploaded after 4 p.m. ET.

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