Looking Up

For the first podcast created exclusively by Cincinnati Public Radio separate from its on-air programming, producers have reached for the stars and bring you Looking Up with the Cincinnati Observatory's Dean Regas and Anna Hehman. 

Looking Up brings you the latest astronomical discoveries,” according to Regas, “in a really fun, quick-paced conversation.  We’ll bring out-of-this-world topics about planets, stars, and the universe, science and technology, throw in a little pop-culture and bring it all down to Earth.”

During each episode, there will be conversations about current astronomical or science happenings, a special guest, then either a Kid Question or a letter from the Observatory's Crank File – a collection of wild, unusual, far-fetched and conspiratorial correspondences collected through the decades.

Dean Regas is the outreach astronomer for the Cincinnati Observatory, co-host of the PBS series Star Gazers, and author of the books 100 Things to See in the Night Sky: From Planets and Satellites to Meteors and Constellations, Your Guide to Stargazing and Facts from Space. Anna Hehman is the Observatory's Director of Development with an innate curiosity about the cosmos.

“I'm excited to join Dean for Looking Up,” Hehman said. “We’ll talk about space, astronomy and cover all the questions a non-astronomer like me has for an astronomer like him.”

Looking Up is produced by Kevin Reynolds and engineered by Josh Elstro and Rick Andress, with technical assistance from Jim Nolan. 

Looking Up will release new episodes twice a month, on the 2nd and 4th Wednesdays. Subscribe on iTunesStitcher or Google Play.

As Valentine's Day approaches, Dean and Anna talk about the romance of space, and some of the myths that exist, plus they look ahead to some of what 2020 has in store in the skies when they talk with Sky and Telescope's news editor, Monica Young.

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On Dean's wish list of guests for the podcast is someone from one of his favorite bands, a somewhat obscure group from the late 90s, early 00s who dressed in space suits and stayed, until the internet, anonymous.

So on this episode, joining Dean and Anna Hehman, is Birdstuff (aka Brain Teasley) from the band Man or Astro-Man? and we think you'll enjoy this offbeat, but obviously joyous to Dean, interview. 

nightskyodyssey.com

Night Sky Odyssey is an augmented reality adventure that lets viewers, using a special headset, look into a dark sky, no matter what light pollution they may be in, and see the stars, constellations, and more.

Dean Regas and Anna Hehman find out more from the program's operations and development director, Jon Marcotte, and science communicator Andres Fazekas.

inclusive-astronomy.org

The International Astronomical Union has been celebrating its 100th anniversary this year and one of its keystone projects was designed to promote and support diversity and inclusivity in the astronomy community.

The project director, Hannah Harris, joins Dean Regas and Anna Hehman to discuss the early results of the project.

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He's a mission manager for Space X, winner of Canada's Greatest Know It All TV competition, co-hosts a podcast, and is the author of a children's book and three Epic Space Adventures books.

Andrew Rader is an accomplished overachiever and he joins Dean Regas and Anna Hehman to talk about his latest book, Beyond the Known: How Exploration Created the Modern World and Will Take Us to the Stars.

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If you think our exploration of Mars ended with NASA's Curiosity, think again!

A new and improved rover is heading to the red planet next year as Dean Regas and Anna Hehman learn from their guest, Ken Williford, deputy project scientist for the Mars 2020 project.

The mysteries of the cosmos have led to wide array of beliefs, stories, legends and more, many of which are completely fabricated with no basis in science or reality.

Author Bob King has released a new book to try address these misconceptions and he joins our Dean Regas and Anna Hehman to talk about Urban Legends from Space: The Biggest Myths About Space Demystified.

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As the successful run of the PBS series Star Gazers comes to an end, it seemed only right to welcome in Dean's co-host of that show, James Albury, for some conversation and reminiscences. James is the director of Santa Fe College's Kika Silva Pla Planetarium.

Randall Munroe

Dean and Anna spend time with Randall Munroe, author of How To: Absurd Scientific Advice for Common Real-World Problems and creator of xkcd.com.

Sharing some truly fascinating stories from his days as a civilian test subject for NASA, Dean Regas and Anna Hehman welcome entrepreneur Kevin Bruns into the studio. 

Summer Ash is a true renaissance woman: former rocket scientist, STEAM educator, STARtorialist blogger, and freelance science communicator.

The music you hear at the start of and throughout each episode of Looking Up is from a band called WHY? and one of its founders, Josiah Wolfe, is also an amateur astronomer who has created several space-themed art and sound installations.

We wrap up our celebration of the 50th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing with one man whose perspective is uniquely different than most – Mark Armstrong, son of NASA legend Neal Armstrong.

He talks about those July days in 1969 and his cameo in the 2018 film about his dad, First Man, in this conversation with hosts Dean Regas and Anna Hehman.

**AUDIO NOTE: We weren't in our home studio for this episode so we apologize for the audio issue during the first 90 seconds or so.**

Mike Massimino could be considered a Renaissance man or a pure over-achiever. He's a retired NASA astronaut who made four space walks during two shuttle missions to the Hubble Telescope. He's a New York Times bestselling author of Spaceman: An Astronaut's Unlikely Journey to Unlock the Secrets of the Universe. He's a professor at Columbia University. He hosts several science/space themed TV shows and documentaries. And he appeared as a version of himself in six episodes of the hit TV series The Big Bang Theory.

Looking Up continues celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, this time by learning more about the entire Apollo mission with Nancy Atkinson, a writer for Universe Today and author of the new book, Eight Years to the Moon: The History of the Apollo Mission.

As the world prepares to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, we go to the hometown of celebrated Astronaut Neil Armstrong so that Dean Regas and Anna Hehman can talk with Dante Cenouri, executive director of the Armstrong Air & Space Museum in Wapakoneta, Ohio.

Listen to their conversation by hitting the play button above. 

Dr. Janet Kavandi is a three-time shuttle astronaut, former Director of Flight Operations for NASA, and currently serves as director of NASA's John H. Glenn Research Center in Cleveland. In addition, she was recently inducted into the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame

Dean Regas and Anna Hehman are proud to welcome Dr. Kavandi to this episode of Looking Up.

 

What started as a hobby, to create a website about his passion for amateur astronomy, has now turned into a 20-year career.

Fraser Cain, proprietor of the Universe Today website, Astronmycast podcast, and the live Weekly Space Hangout, joins Dean Regas and Anna Hehman to talk about the evolution of these projects and what continues to make it fun after all this time.

The first picture of a black hole was a worldwide phenomenon, but what is our fascination with these astronomical mysteries?

Dean Regas and Anna Hehman welcome Nathaniel Scharping, an editor for Discover magazine who wrote about the black hole photograph for Astronomy magazine and astronomy.com.

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Did you know that there is an observatory at the Vatican? Did you now that the two men in charge of the research and operations taking place there are both from the Midwest? 

In this transatlantic conversation, Dean Regas and Anna Hehman learn about the Vatican Observatory from its director, Brother Guy Consolmagno (from Detroit) and head of the Jesuit community at the observatory, Father Paul Mueller (from Cincinnati, a St. Xavier High School graduate).

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