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**Beginning Monday, August 13, Morning Edition will change its clock, meaning there will now be national and local newscasts at the top and bottom of the hour, allowing for slightly longer segments so you get more of the news, insights, and analysis you expect from NPR and WVXU. So adjust your morning routine ever so slightly starting August 13, and thanks for listening!**

For more than two decades, NPR's Morning Edition has prepared listeners for the day ahead with two hours of up-to-the-minute news, background analysis, commentary, and coverage of arts and sports. With nearly 13 million listeners, Morning Edition draws public radio's largest audience.

One of the most respected news magazines in the world, Morning Edition airs Monday through Friday on more than 600 NPR stations across the United States, and around the globe on NPR's international services.

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As COVID-19 continues to sweep the nation, Latinx people are among those who are being hit the hardest.

"I would equate what we've seen with the Latino population as kind of the perfect storm," said Dr. Joseph Betancourt, the vice president and chief equity and inclusion officer at Massachusetts General Hospital, in an interview with NPR's Morning Edition.

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Let's refine a big question about Russian bounties on the heads of U.S. troops in Afghanistan.

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Good morning. I'm Noel King. A teenager got clever with tech to help people follow health guidelines. Fifteen-year-old Max Melia invented a watch that warns users when they're about to touch their faces with this sound.

(SOUNDBITE OF DEVICE BEEPING)

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Updated 8:15 p.m. ET

How severe is the spread of COVID-19 in your community? If you're confused, you're not alone. Though state and local dashboards provide lots of numbers, from case counts to deaths, it's often unclear how to interpret them — and hard to compare them to other places.

Mississippi is seeing a sharp uptick in new coronavirus cases. The state is reporting double the number of new cases that it was seeing just two weeks ago. The average number of new cases each day this week is just over 600. And on June 25, the state reported more than 1,000 cases in a single day for the first time.

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Have A Corn Dog: Fair Food Without The Fair

Jun 30, 2020

It's a grim year for fans of summer fairs. The 165th annual Big Butler Fair in Pennsylvania's Butler County has been called off due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The week of fair games, fried food and barns full of prize-winning animals has been a tradition for Butler County since the American Civil War.

Canceled fairs are an obvious blow to local 4-H and Future Farmers of America clubs who have been training animals for months to compete in livestock shows. But it's a big hit to food vendors, too.

Hospitals in Texas are inundated by coronavirus patients. On Monday, the state reported almost 6,000 people hospitalized with COVID-19. That's a record, as cases spike following the state's reopening of bars, restaurants and stores in early May. Because of this latest surge, Texas Gov.

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