The World

Weekdays at 8 PM
  • Hosted by Lisa Mullins

PRI’s The World is a one-hour, weekday radio news magazine offering a mix of news, features, interviews, and music from around the globe. Hosted by Lisa Mullins in Boston, it is the first global radio news program developed specifically for an American audience.

Ways to Connect

Musician Rafael Carvalho tunes his viola da terra, a 12-stringed, double-hearted small guitar and begins to play a sweetly wistful melody. As he plucks away at the strings, Carvalho’s viola fills the room with poignant music described in Portuguese as saudade — which captures a longing for family and friends who have emigrated abroad and nostalgia for the homeland left behind.

Roman Sabal served in the United States Marine Corps for six years, and in the US Army Reserves for several more. But on Monday, border officials at San Ysidro denied Sabal entry to the US for a scheduled citizenship interview.

Sabal lived in the US for more than a decade and joined the Marines in 1987, eager to serve the US. In 2008, he returned to Belize for a visit and while he was gone, a judge ordered him to be deported at a court hearing he was not aware of because he was not in the US. 

Somali Canadian journalist Hodan Nalayeh loved to share positive stories about her homeland and celebrate its beauty.

Roundups of undocumented immigrant families conducted by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents could start Sunday in 10 US cities, fulfilling a hardline immigration stance from US President Donald Trump, the New York Times reported, citing unnamed sources including two current and one former homeland security officials.

One diplomat has been entrusted with the task of bringing warring sides in Yemen together. United Nations Special Envoy to Yemen Martin Griffiths has made progress where others have not.

In December, people in Yemen — and the world's diplomatic community — were surprised that a diplomatic meeting in Stockholm arranged by Griffiths led to action steps, including a drawback from a likely battle over the Red Sea port Hodeidah.

President Donald Trump had good reason to welcome Tamim bin Hamad al-Thani, the emir of Qatar, to the White House.

The crowd at the Parc Olympique Lyonnais in Lyon chanted "Equal pay!" as the US women's soccer team defeated the Netherlands 2-0 to win their fourth World Cup title. Before the final, US co-captain Megan Rapinoe criticized FIFA for disparities in prize money between the men and women. 

American financier Jeffrey Epstein pleaded not guilty on Monday to charges of sex trafficking as prosecutors accused him of luring dozens of girls as young as 14 to his luxury homes in New York and Florida and paying them for sex acts.

An indictment unsealed in federal court in Manhattan accused Epstein, 66, of arranging for girls to perform nude "massages" and other sex acts and paying some girls to recruit others, from at least 2002 to 2005.

A war crime: That's how the United Nations' envoy to Libya describes what happened there Wednesday

An airstrike killed more than 40 migrants in a detention center near the country's capital of Tripoli. The attack is blamed on forces loyal to the warlord Khalifa Haftar, who has been trying to seize control of Tripoli since April. The UN has called for an independent investigation of the bombing, which claimed the lives of women and children and is one of the biggest single losses of life since the civil war in 2011. 

Marco Werman: A Cold War baby visits Putin's Russia

Jun 28, 2019

The past resides in the present in Moscow in a way that feels carefully curated. 

Look up as you walk through the hallways of Moscow’s gleaming Metro. The decorative ceiling roses feature small details: Soviet stars interspersed with tiny hammers and sickles. In the wide public spaces, many statues of Lenin have been removed, but just enough have been studiously preserved to remind people of the intellectual prowess of the revolution — not the lethal, nasty part.

Friday marks the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, which became one of the most pivotal moments in the international movement for LGBTQ rights. 

On June 28, 1969, the gay rights movement jumped into the American public consciousness.

On June 11, as humanitarian aid worker Scott Warren sat trial in Tucson, Arizona, on charges of harboring undocumented immigrants, longtime migrant rights’ advocates Cristóbal Sánchez and Irineo Mujica found themselves in a Tapachula, Mexico, courtroom. 

The two men, who gained international attention when they accompanied caravans of Central American migrants to the United States’ southern border last fall, had been arrested a week before. Both were accused of receiving money to smuggle Honduran migrants across Mexico.

Allan Manuel, a 22-year-old photo lab technician drafted into the Korean War, remembers the sound of machine gunfire breaking the night’s silence in an abandoned neighborhood in Seoul. 

He and other members of the US forces were squatting inside empty houses. Allan Manuel — normally armed with a camera, not a gun — peered into the street from the doorway. 

It was the Newport, Rhode Island, native’s only known encounter with battle, but it stayed with him some five decades later. The year was 1952. 

When Wajed al-Khalifa and her family arrived in the US as refugees in 2015, everything about the United States seemed foreign. They were resettled to Turlock, California, a rural city about two hours east of San Francisco.

The United Nations is condemning itself over its handling of the crisis involving Myanmar's Rohingya minority. Over the past decade, nearly 1 million Rohingya have escaped violence and persecution in Myanmar. The mass exodus attracted worldwide attention and criticism over the UN's role.

When Egyptians poured into the streets of Cairo back in 2011, Hend Nafie was excited.

"I was hoping for personal freedom," she said. "I wanted to be free. I wanted my family to accept me [as] who I am."

Nafie grew up in a conservative family in a village in the Nile Delta. She says her family was strict. Her parents didn’t want her to go to school or make any decisions for herself.

"So, when I participated in the revolution, it was the first time that I feel like I did something I really wanted," she said.

Thousands of women walk off jobs in Switzerland

Jun 14, 2019

Thousands of women across Switzerland held a strike Friday to highlight their nation's poor record on women’s rights. The wealthy country, surrounded by other progressive countries, has long been lacking in women's rights.

Hongkongers wield ‘people power’ to protest extradition to mainland

Jun 14, 2019

Hundreds of thousands took to the streets of Hong Kong this week to protest an extradition bill. The bill, which will cover Hong Kong residents and foreign and Chinese nationals living or traveling in the city, has many concerned that it may threaten the rule of law that supports Hong Kong's international financial status, as well as its legal system.

It’s after sundown, but the woman in a video on Twitter is still wearing a sun hat as she shouts at Hong Kong police officers. 

Holding up a mobile phone in front of her, she asks the cops if they want to send her back to China. When one of them offers her a snack because she may be tired. She refuses. 

“I don’t take things from running dogs,” the woman says. 

Amsterdam, famed for its picturesque canals, Anne Frank museum and Vincent Van Gogh art collection, is facing a challenge many cities can only dream of.

The Dutch capital, with its tolerant attitude to drugs and prostitution, is such a tourist draw that the city is now openly encouraging visitors to go elsewhere.

Pages