The World

Weekdays at 8 PM
  • Hosted by Lisa Mullins

PRI’s The World is a one-hour, weekday radio news magazine offering a mix of news, features, interviews, and music from around the globe. Hosted by Lisa Mullins in Boston, it is the first global radio news program developed specifically for an American audience.

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Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Trump, Biden battle for Latino vote in Arizona

Sep 15, 2020

This story is part of "Every 30 Seconds," a collaborative public media reporting project tracing the young Latino electorate leading up to the 2020 presidential election and beyond.

With just weeks left before the 2020 presidential election, both candidates are making a push for Arizona, particularly Latino voters in Arizona.

This story is part of "Every 30 Seconds," a collaborative public media reporting project tracing the young Latino electorate leading up to the 2020 presidential election and beyond.

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

On Tuesday, demonstrations against a hair care advertisement continued across South Africa, after the campaign was run online last week by Clicks, a major pharmaceutical, beauty and health retail chain. It prompted outrage on social media, with many people calling it racist.

The ad pictured a Black woman with curly hair that was labeled "dry," "damaged," "frizzy" and "dull."

On the other side, was an image of a white woman with blonde, straight hair. Hers was labeled "fine," "flat," and "normal."

The board overseeing Latin America and the Caribbean’s most important development bank is set to vote for a new president this weekend, amid controversy surrounding a candidate nominated by the Trump administration. 

The election could embroil the Inter-American Development Bank in its most heated succession contest ever. The bank loans more than $13 billion every year to fund social and infrastructure projects across the continent and will play a key role in funding the region’s economic recovery from the pandemic. 

When Daiara Tukano was growing up, she learned from her family what it meant to care for the natural world and look after the rich ecology of Indigenous peoples’ traditional lands.

“Indigenous peoples, in a general way, know that humankind is not the center of the universe. We learn with nature around us because we are a part of nature,” said Tukano, a human rights researcher who belongs to the Tukano people of Northern Brazil. 

In the global race to develop a COVID-19 vaccine, clinical trials have ramped up in the US, UK, China and beyond. Researchers and pharmaceutical companies face growing political pressure to develop and distribute one soon. 

But when and if there is an effective vaccine, the supply could be limited. So, who gets it first? That is a critical question playing out on the world stage in a pandemic that knows no borders. 

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Ghana is famous for its textiles. They’re full of vibrant colors and striking, repeating patterns.

But if you look more closely at the fabric produced in recent months by the brand Ghana Textiles Printing (GTP), you’ll notice something unusual about the patterns: They’re padlocks, airplanes and keys.

This series of designs was inspired by the coronavirus pandemic.

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

In his new book, writer Roberto Lovato describes El Salvador as "a tiny country of titanic sorrows." 

And those sorrows, especially in recent decades, have been tightly bound up with lives led thousands of miles to the north of the small Central American country in cities like San Francisco and Washington, DC.

When Mali’s military arrested former President Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta to protect the nation as a “true democracy,” crowds in the capital Bamako erupted in cheers.

Two weeks later, that enthusiasm has not waned — at least within Mali.

Related: Protesters in Mali call for president to step down

South Korea is trying to stop a new surge of COVID-19 infections. And now, after restricting access to churches, health authorities are targeting another sacred institution: the coffee shop.

Cafés in downtown Seoul were nearly empty during lunch hour on Monday. These businesses are usually filled with office workers who drop in for a cup of their favorite brew and chat with colleagues before heading back to their jobs.

Millions of schoolchildren across Mexico began the academic year this week in front of a screen — not with interactive online classes with a teacher, but with prerecorded programs on TV. It’s part of a distance learning effort announced by federal officials earlier this month. 

Mexico’s government has signed agreements with the country’s largest TV networks to open up new digital channels to beam distance learning programs into student homes. 

It’s an iconic moment that signaled the symbolic, if not yet actual, end of the Soviet Union.

Aug. 23, 1991. A crowd of thousands had gathered at Lubyanka Square just opposite the KGB headquarters.

Boris Yeltsin, Russia’s future first president, had just rallied the public in a successful — and terrifying — three-day revolt against a coup by Soviet hard-liners against democratic reforms then sweeping the USSR.

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Annual Pride celebrations are not common in cities across China, but the city of Shanghai is an exception, where Pride events have occurred for a dozen years.

But now organizers say this year’s ShanghaiPRIDE festival is on hold to protect the “safety” of all involved. The rest of this year’s scheduled events in Shanghai are canceled and future events are on indefinite hiatus.

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

President Donald Trump is trying to keep his promised border wall with Mexico in the public eye during his reelection bid, touting it on his recent trip to Yuma, Arizona.

But the wall brought Trump unwanted attention last Thursday when former White House adviser Steve Bannon was arrested on charges that he and three associates ripped off donors to an online fundraising effort that aimed to build a privately funded barrier.

Zoom weddings: A blessing in disguise?

Aug 24, 2020

Since my family and I moved from Argentina to the US in 1998, my two brothers and I often wondered what we’d do when — and if — we got married. Do we ask our Argentine relatives to travel? Do we ask our American friends to travel to Argentina? Do we get married ... twice? 

Dating shows aren’t exactly rare when you’re scrolling through Netflix. The streaming service has debuted a slew of such shows this summer, including “Love is Blind,” “Too Hot to Handle” and “Indian Matchmaking.” 

But the newest iteration, produced in Australia, is causing some people to take a closer look at the genre.

Could migration be a solution to the climate crisis?

Aug 21, 2020

As climate change reshapes our world, it’s also going to change where we live. Up to a billion people are expected to move by 2050 to escape the worst impacts of drought, rising sea levels and natural disasters.

On a warm morning back in June, Hossanna Pacheco stared excitedly at her computer screen. The Los Angeles 11-year-old was achieving her first educational milestone — graduating 5th grade — and she was doing it over Zoom. 

This week, like hundreds of thousands of students across Los Angeles, she started school from a Chromebook in her living room. 

Hossanna is excited to be in middle school. But her mom, Mireya Pacheco, is not as excited.

“I’m worried,” Pacheco said. “I don’t know how we will do it.”

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Four years on, litigation of the 2016 presidential election continues. Not doing so is a tacit acceptance of other countries' ability to skew results of the United States' elections.

This week, the Senate Intelligence Committee released the fifth and final volume of its report on Russian interference. It's nearly 1,000-pages and mostly takes a look back. But it's filled with clear warnings for this election. 

Heavy rains that began in July have caused floods that have killed more than a hundred people across Yemen. In the Yemeni capital of Sanaa, floodwaters have coursed through a 2,500-year old-neighborhood, the Old City, which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. 

The mercury hit 130 degrees in Death Valley, California, last weekend. If the provisional measurements are upheld, it’ll be the hottest temperature ever recorded on Earth using modern equipment.

The scorching heat hasn’t subsided much since then.

“It’s rare for us to get (heat waves) really remaining over a week to 10 days, and in this case it could actually be a couple weeks,” said National Weather Service meteorologist Curt Kaplan.

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