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Cincinnatians participate in a national memorial for those lost to gun violence

Family members who have lost a loved one because of gun violence leave remembrance items inside the glass bricks of the four houses that are the cornerstone of the Gun Violence Memorial Project.
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Family members who have lost a loved one because of gun violence leave remembrance items inside the glass bricks of the four houses that are the cornerstone of the Gun Violence Memorial Project.

You don't have to look far to see the toll gun violence has taken on Cincinnati. Local headlines and nightly TV news coverage chronicle the carnage firearms inflict on our neighbors — an impact that has increased in the last two years as violent crime has swelled.

Now, residents of Cincinnati and other areas across the country are taking part in an effort to raise awareness about gun violence and memorialize its victims. The city of Cincinnati's Office of Human Relations and Recreation Commission partnered with Everytown for Gun Safety to participate in the Gun Violence Memorial Project, which collected objects prized by victims of gun violence across the country and placed them in glass houses on display in the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C. Those items will stay there until next fall.

Joining Cincinnati Edition to discuss the project and the heavy cost of gun violence are Cincinnati Office of Human Relations Division Manager Paul M. Booth, Everytown Survivor Network Survivor Outreach Lead Pastor Jackie Jackson and Cincinnati resident Bridget Swint, who has lost family members to gun violence and participated in the memorial.

Listen to Cincinnati Edition live at noon M-F. Audio for this segment will be uploaded after 4 p.m. ET.

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