2015 election

Hamilton County's final count in the November 5 election began Tuesday, and the results could have a major impact on some suburban races that were very close in the unofficial count on election night.

Tuesday, the board of elections approved counting 11,797 provisional ballots that were cast on election day.

The board ended up rejecting 1,028 – 666 of them because the people who cast them were not registered voters.

Howard Wilkinson / WVXU

The Hamilton County Board of Elections spent two-and-a-half hours Tuesday morning delving into an investigation of last week’s election, which was plagued with problems caused by a new electronic poll book system.

One thing the board learned was this – the company that sold that sold it the $1.4 million system, Tenex, was willing to take the blame for the technical snafus.

WVXU-FM

  WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik this morning about the problems Hamilton County had with its new electronic polling system last Tuesday night; and how they plan to fix it. 

Tuesday, over 198,000 Hamilton County voters checked in at their polling places and were processed with the brand-new electronic poll books and had absolutely no problems whatsoever.

They checked in; they voted; they went home with a “I voted” sticker for their lapels and shirt pockets.

But for a relative handful of voters – no one is quite sure yet how many, but board of elections officials call it a “significant number” – the new system caused a major headache and that ended up with several thousand more voters than usual casting provisional ballots; and, perhaps, disenfranchised some – probably because they got fed up with waiting and left the polling places.

Keith Lanser / Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

Now that Cincinnati voters have rejected a property tax levy to fund city parks, the question becomes how to pay for maintenance and upgrades?  

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Update 11/7:

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted told the Hamilton County Board of Elections Friday he wants a review of the county's problems with electronic poll books completed by Dec. 11. 

Board members have already launched their investigation into what went wrong Tuesday, when poll worker confusion and technical problems with the new e-poll books caused a judge to extend voting hours to 9 p.m. 

WVXU-FM

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Wednesday morning about Tuesday's election results in the Tristate - including the massive defeat if Issue 3, which would have legalized marijuana in Ohio; Issue 22; the Cincinnati Parks levy rejected soundly by city voters, and Matt Bevin's somewhat surprising win over Jack Conway in the Kentucky governor's race. 

Ann Thompson

A controversial one mill levy for city parks that would have become a permanent part of Cincinnati’s city charter appeared headed for a resounding defeat Tuesday night.

In Tuesday night's unofficial vote count, the “no” vote on Issue 22 was 59 percent, with only 41 percent voting “yes.”

WVXU / via Wikimedia Commons

Ohio voters Tuesday soundly rejected a state constitutional amendment that would have legalized marijuana in Ohio and opened the door to a multi-million dollar industry growing and selling the plant.

With 97 percent of the state’s precincts reporting, 64 percent of Ohio voters were saying no to the plan, while 36 percent were saying they supported it.

Provided

Two Republicans who were appointed to vacant Hamilton County Municipal Court judgeships were elected to fill out the terms Tuesday.

With 100 percent of the vote counted in the 4th Municipal Court district, Judge Curt Kissinger rolled over Democrat Shane Herzner. Kissinger took 72 percent of the unofficial vote, while Herzner had 28  percent.

Karen Kasler / Ohio Public Radio

The first issue on the Ohio ballot was the first to be called, as it was apparent early on that voters were approving it overwhelmingly.

Once the ultimate political outsider, Louisville businessman Matt Bevin became the second Republican Kentucky governor in four decades Tuesday, defeating Democratic Attorney General Jack Conway.

With all of the state’s 120 counties reporting, Bevin led with 525 percent to 43.8  percent for Conway and four percent for independent Drew Curtis.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Voting hours for Hamilton County extended by 90 minutes until 9 p.m. so voters who may not have voted because of glitches at the polling places can vote, a judge has ruled. 

Hamilton County Common Pleas Court Judge Robert Ruehlmann made the decision after a hastily-arranged  hearing on a motion filed by an individual associated with ResponsibleOhio, the group backing Issue 3, which would legalize marijuana.  

WVXU-FM

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson talked with news director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday about Tuesday's general election in the Tristate and the special election to be held next June to replace former House Speaker John Boehner in Ohio's 8th Congressional District. 

If you are going to your polling place Tuesday – or if you have voted already – you are likely in the minority among your friends, your co-workers, and your neighbors.

Most of them will not vote in Tuesday’s election – either in Kentucky, where they are choosing a new governor; or in Ohio, where voters are being asked to approve not only the legalization of marijuana but the creation of a large and likely very profitable industry to grow, process and sell it.

New governor? Legalizing marijuana? Sounds to us like the kind of things that should bring voters out in droves.

Michael Keating / WVXU

Cincinnati’s Issue 22, the charter amendment that would institute a one mill park levy, has been the object of intense political warfare and heated rhetoric this fall.

The two city charter amendments that follow it on Tuesday’s ballot in Cincinnati – Issue 23 and Issue 24 - have produced nothing but silence.

 

There really weren’t supposed to be any races for municipal court judgeships in Hamilton County this year.

But, as it turns, a promotion of one municipal court judge and the election of another to a higher court, has produced two races for the unexpired terms.

But not everyone in the county will get to vote on them. Both judgeships are in one of the county’s seven municipal court districts.

What happened was this:

  Most of the race between Democrat Jack Conway and Republican Matt Bevin, has been mean as a rattlesnake, and just as venomous, with attack ads and mail pieces clogging the airwaves and the mailboxes of the Commonwealth.

But the end of a debate on Kentucky Educational Television Monday night – the last before the election between Bevin and Conway ended on an almost conciliatory note.

Kentucky voters head to the polls next Tuesday to choose the commonwealth'’s next governor: businessman and Republican Matt Bevin, or Democrat and current Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway.

Keith Lanser / Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons

To say the proponents of Issue 22, which would place a one mill permanent tax levy in Cincinnati’s charter, are out-spending the opposition would be the understatement of the century.

Citizens for Cincinnati Parks, the pro-Issue 22 committee, raised $647,535 through Oct. 14, according to campaign finance reports filed Thursday. Just over half of the money came from corporate interests and corporations.

Save Our Parks, the committee opposed to Issue 22, raised only $3,154, according to its campaign finance report.

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