2016 presidential election

trump rally cincinnati
John Minchillo / AP

Ohio, which had a reputation as the nation's ultimate bellwether state in presidential elections, threw everyone for a loop in 2016 when voters here chose Donald Trump over Hillary Clinton.

donald trump cincinnati
Howard Wilkinson / WVXU

Donald Trump, both as candidate and president, has made a habit of blaming everything that is wrong in this country on the news media, calling them "dishonest" and "corrupt" and even the enemy of the people.

Vice President Mike Pence came to a Springdale business Thursday and pledged the Trump administration will "lift the weight of Obamacare off American families and businesses."

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Sen. Mitch McConnell addressed the Northern Kentucky and Cincinnati Chambers of Commerce Thursday afternoon in Covington. The Senate Majority Leader is touring the state during the congressional recess. 

He was interrupted twice during his remarks by two people wanting, as they said, "to be heard." Both people were escorted out of the ticketed luncheon.

It's rather a challenge to choose the most egregious and patently false "alternative fact" to come out of the Trump administration since its inception, but the one the president laid on Congressional leaders in a meeting last week may take the cake.

But it's early.

President Trump – who lost the popular vote to Hillary Clinton by nearly 3 million votes but won the Electoral College – repeated his apparently long-held belief that three to five million "illegal votes" cost him the popular vote.

For a period of time even longer than the Chicago Cubs' 108-year drought between World Series championships, Ohio has been the bellwether of this country's presidential politics.

When Ohio went for Donald Trump on Nov. 8 it marked the 29th time in the past 31 presidential elections that Ohio went with the winner, a record unmatched by any other state in that period of time.

That's the mark of a bellwether state.

But it's not the only mark.

Naturally, Democrats in Hamilton County were as shocked and disbelieving as Democrats anywhere else Tuesday night when Donald Trump won the White House, even though nearly all the indicators leading up to the election pointed to a Hillary Clinton victory.

It will take them some time to get over that; and some considerable time to figure out how they can fight back, as members of a party that doesn’t control either the executive or legislative branches of government – and are looking warily at what might happen to the judicial branch.

It's a tough pill to swallow.

We Look At This Week's Top Local Stories

Nov 11, 2016
Jim Nolan/WVXU

 

Each Friday on Cincinnati Edition, we present an in-depth discussion of the developments behind the headlines. 

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

The local chapter of the Council on American Islamic Relations has watched Donald Trump's campaign with some trepidation.

CAIR executive director Karen Dabdoub says there's concern based on Trump's comments about deportations during the campaign.

Pete Rightmire/WVXU

 

News organizations across the country and around the world summed up Donald Trump's decisive victory over Hillary Clinton to become the nation's 45th president with one word: shocking. 

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Butler County Board of Elections Deputy Director Jocelyn Bucaro was direct and to the point when hosting an 11:30 a.m. conference call with reporters Tuesday about how the election was going halfway through the day .

"It's going smoothly," Bucaro said. She said long lines had cleared out from the morning and midday voters were able to get in and out quickly. The busiest polling places were in Lakota, Monroe, parts of Fairfield and Middletown.

NPR Live Election Blog

Nov 8, 2016

NPR reporters are updating this breaking news blog in real time as results come in from around the country.

The NPR Politics team and member station reporters are providing live updates, pictures, video, commentary and analysis.

New stories will populate at the top of the page. Get a more in-depth look at each one of these races by clicking the “View Results” link in the top right of the blog.

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Jim Nolan/WVXU

Each Friday on Cincinnati Edition we present an in-depth discussion of the developments behind the headlines. 

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is asking his supporters and other Democrats to spend the next several days working to make sure Republican Donald Trump is not the next president.  

The former Democratic candidate is now supporting Hillary Clinton.  

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Though most political pundits say Donald Trump's chances to win 270 electoral votes, and the White House, are unlikely, latest polling shows the race is now a virtual tie between Trump and Hillary Clinton. 

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National pollsters have been closely watching Ohio while weighing the odds in this year's presidential race, but on November 8 Ohio voters will also elect one member to represent them in the U.S. Senate.

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The race for who will become the next mayor of Covington seems to be focused on two very different perceptions of the city and whether or not it is moving in the right direction.

Political types on both sides agree – the race for Hamilton County commissioner between Republican Dennis Joseph Deters and Democrat Denise Driehaus is the most fiercely contested and most costly race this year for any county office.

And, if the polling that is said to be out there is correct, it may also be the closest contest, the one that keeps everyone up late on election night waiting for an outcome – quite possibly into the wee hours of the morning after.

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There are two seats up for election on the Board of Hamilton County Commissioners

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Hillary Clinton stopped in Cincinnati Monday night for a campaign rally eight days before the election.  

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