2020 presidential election

donald trump cincinnati
John Minchillo / AP

President Trump made his seventh visit to the Cincinnati area Thursday, with a "Keep America Great" rally at US Bank Arena on the riverfront. Now that the hoopla is over, what do the polls say about Trump's chances of repeating not just his eight-point win in Ohio in 2016, but of winning a second term? Senior Political Analyst Howard Wilkinson spoke with WVXU's Jay Hanselman about where Trump goes from here.

Wikimedia Commons

President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence are planning an Aug. 1 re-election campaign rally at Cincinnati's US Bank Arena - which raises the question of why they are stumping here so early in the campaign. Trump did not win either Hamilton County or Cincinnati in 2016. WVXU's Senior Political Analyst, Howard Wilkinson, told News Director Maryanne Zeleznik that his real audience is in not in Cincinnati, but in the suburban and rural counties which surround it.

kate schroder nikki foster
Courtesy of Kate Schroder and Nikki Foster

You would think that, at some point, this gerrymandering trick Ohio Republicans played eight years ago to create a Democrat-proof district for U.S. Rep. Steve Chabot would wear thin.

marcus thompson
Courtesy of Marcus Thompson

On the morning of Saturday, June 22 – exactly 500 days before the 2020 election – the Hamilton County Republican Party hopes to fill the Sharonville Convention Center with the GOP faithful for a gigantic pep rally that will feature Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, President Trump's campaign press secretary Kayleigh McEnany, and a cast of thousands.

joe deters
John Minchillo / AP

Is Hamilton County blue? Or is it purple? No point in asking whether or not it is still red; that train left the station some time ago.

But it's time to settle this blue-purple hash once and for all – and the 2020 general election is the time to do it.

aftax sales tax petition
Howard Wilkinson / WVXU

Alex Triantafilou, the chairman of the Hamilton County Republican Party, would be well-pleased on the morning of Saturday, June 22, if the traffic on Chester Road in Sharonville is bumper-to-bumper with cars trying to make their way into the parking lot of the Sharonville Convention Center.

With nearly twenty candidates now vying for the Democratic presidential nomination, one legislator who considered a run is comfortable with his decision not to. Sherrod Brown shared his view of the field.

It’s no surprise to Brown that so many candidates want to unseat the current leader, who Brown said has done a terrible job. Among the recently announced candidates is fellow Ohioan Tim Ryan, the democratic congressman from the Youngstown area. Brown is not saying who he’s supporting at this point.

hillary clinton
Andrew Harnik / AP

For the time being, an Ohio group has pulled out of a ballot issue this year to have the state join a nationwide movement to bypass the Electoral College and elect the president by popular vote.

Tim Ryan rallied voters in his hometown over the weekend, garnering support for his bid for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination amid a crowded field.

cincinnati edition
Jim Nolan / WVXU

A 23-year-old man shows up in Newport and claims he's Timmothy Pitzen, who disappeared at the age of six in May, 2011 from the Chicago area. DNA test results reveal the hoax. 

Ohio Rep. Tim Ryan is the latest Democrat to join the growing field seeking the 2020 presidential nomination.

Ryan announced his intentions on ABC's The View on Thursday, telling the panel that he is running to be a champion for manufacturing in a country that has been fractured by trade and outsourcing.

"I understand that legacy of job loss. ... I understand where we need to go. The country's so divided right now that we can't get a plan together. The first thing we ought to do is unify," Ryan said.

WVXU-FM

WVXU senior political analyst Howard Wilkinson spoke with Jay Hanselman Monday morning about a recent Quinnipiac University poll of American voters that had some bad news for President Trump - 53% of those polled said they will not vote for Trump for re-election, including 60% of all women voters. Anything over 50% is the last thing an incumbent wants to see, although he has plenty of time to turn that around.

donald trump
Gene J. Puskar / AP

How's this for bad campaign optics?

rob portman
John Minchillo / AP

Ordinarily, a U.S. senator endorsing the president of his own party for re-election would be nothing out of the ordinary.

That's what you would expect the senator to do, right? Under ordinary circumstances, that is.

Pete Buttigieg, the 37-year-old Democratic mayor of South Bend, Ind., announced last week that he intends to run for president.

An openly gay man and a veteran of the war in Afghanistan, Buttigieg has been identified by top Democrats — including former President Barack Obama – as a potential future leader for the party.

U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown’s supporters gave him a send-off Wednesday night before his tour of early presidential primary and caucus states.

Brown hasn’t officially launched a bid for the Democratic nomination, but has been working to insert his voice into the party’s growing presidential conversation. His “Dignity of Work” tour has stops scheduled in Iowa through Saturday, with visits expected in New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina.

suburbs
Pixabay

I suppose this debate over whether Ohio is a red state, a purple state, or blue state with a very faint pulse is going to go on for quite a while.

sherrod brown
John Minchillo / AP

Starting out a possible run for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination is an ambitious project in the best of circumstances. But starting out with a well-respected national poll showing that 77 percent of American voters say they don't know enough about you to form an opinion about you – good or bad – might make you think you are running in quicksand.

WVXU file

WVXU politics reporter Howard Wilkinson spoke with News Director Maryanne Zeleznik Monday morning about the fact that one Ohio Republican - soon-to-be-former governor John Kasixh - and one Ohio Democrat - newly-re-elected Sen. Sherrod Brown are clearly interested in being the next president.

2020 presidential candidates
From top L-R: Emily Prechti; Gage Skidmore (2); Wikimedia; AP; Phil Roeder; Wikimedia; Courtesy

No one can accuse Ohio's newly re-elected U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown of letting the moss grow under his feet.

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