abortion

heartbeat bill
Ann Sanner / AP

In April, Ohio passed a so-called "heartbeat" bill into law, banning abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detected, as early as six weeks into pregnancy. No exception is made for cases of rape or incest but the bill does allow for abortions in cases where a woman's life is at risk. Several other states including Kentucky have passed similar bans that are either soon to take effect or have been blocked in federal court.

Among the changes the Senate made to the House version of the budget was a $5 million boost to a program that funds centers that counsel pregnant women against abortion.

The sponsor of a bill requiring fetal remains to be buried or cremated is pleased about a U.S. Supreme Court ruling on a similar law from Indiana.

Updated at 2:10 p.m. ET

The Supreme Court is leaving in place part of an Indiana law that mandates that aborted fetuses be buried or cremated.

The court did not take up a second part of the law that banned abortions because of fetal abnormality, the fetus's race, sex or ancestry. A lower court struck down that part of the law in addition to the burial provision. The Supreme Court, though, said it will wait for other lower court rulings before weighing in on the fetal characteristics provision.

The recent passage of the so-called "Heartbeat Bill" has caused some confusion about the legality of abortion in Ohio. Gov. MIke DeWine signed the legislation into law last month, but it does not take effect until July. The ACLU and other organizations have sued, hoping to prevent the law from going into effect. Morning Edition host Amy Eddings spoke with Be Well Health reporter Marlene Harris-Taylor about the current realities of abortion access in Ohio.

Let's start with the facts about this new law. How does it does it work?

More than a month after Gov. Mike DeWine signed one of the most restrictive abortion bans in the country, a lawsuit has been filed in federal court to stop it from taking effect in July. It bans abortion as early as six weeks into a pregnancy.

A new bill at the Ohio Statehouse would require doctors to provide information to women receiving a medication abortion on how they could reverse the procedure. 

ce friday
Jim Nolan / WVXU

Ohio’s Congressional map is likely headed to the U.S. Supreme Court, after a panel of federal judges ruled it's unconstitutionally gerrymandered to favor one political party over the other. The Ohio legislature considers an abortion bill more restrictive than the "Heartbeat Bill" Governor Mike DeWine signed just last month.

The Dayton City Commission is urging Dayton’s two major health-care systems to sign a transfer agreement with the Miami Valley’s last-remaining abortion provider.

The agreement is required by state law. And without it, the clinic is in danger of closing.

Among the city commission members, four out of five voted in favor of the resolution asking Kettering Health Network and Premier Health to sign the transfer agreement with Women’s Med Center in Kettering.

Legal efforts to challenge the state requirement have so far been unsuccessful.

A new bill would ban most private insurance coverage for abortions. But opponents say it would also ban effective methods of birth control. 

At the end of last year, former Gov. John Kasich signed a bill into law that bans a surgical procedure most commonly used in second trimester abortions. Now a federal court is blocking part of that new law from going into effect. 

Ohio’s newest law that bans abortion after a fetal heartbeat is detected is supposed to go into effect in three months. But there’s a very good chance it won’t because there’s a legal challenge looming.

It’s taken eight years and many hours of testimony, but the so-called “Heartbeat Bill” has been signed into law. Gov. Mike DeWine delivered on his campaign promise to sign the controversial legislation that bans abortion after a fetal heartbeat is detected. But where does it go from here?

As expected, Gov. Mike DeWine has signed a bill that bans abortions at the point when a fetal heartbeat is detected.

For the third time, a bill that bans abortion from the point a fetal heartbeat is detected has passed the Ohio House and Senate.  But this time will likely be the last for what's been called the "Heartbeat Bill", because Gov. Mike DeWine says he’ll sign it into law. 

An Ohio House committee is set to hear a bill tomorrow that would ban elective abortions as early as six weeks of pregnancy. Opponents of that legislation are concerned about changes in what's been known as the "Heartbeat Bill".  

The controversy over Kentucky’s only abortion clinic continues to draw national attention.  The latest development is that Kentucky’s Democratic Attorney General filed a 'friend of the court' brief on April 4, supported by 21 attorneys general from across the U.S. in the effort to keep the clinic open.

The filing is related to a regulation requiring a 'transfer and transport agreement' that would have necessitated the EMW Women’s Surgical Clinic in Louisville have an agreement with an ambulance service to 'transport' a patient to a hospital in case of an emergency. A 'transfer' agreement would mean a hospital agreed to treat a patient of the EMW Clinic who shows up at an emergency room.


The fate of Dayton’s last remaining abortion provider may end up in the hands of the Ohio Supreme Court. Attorneys for Women’s Med Center say they’ll appeal a lower court decision that could threaten the clinic’s continued operations.

An attorney for the abortion provider says the latest court decision is not unexpected.

Kentucky’s Republican-controlled legislature approved four anti-abortion measures this session, all of which were signed into law by Republican Gov. Matt Bevin.

Bevin has signed several anti-abortion bills since he became governor in 2015 with nearly all of them struck down either temporarily or permanently in federal court.

During a rally at the Capitol earlier this month, Bevin — who’s also running for re-election — celebrated the anti-abortion measures being passed through the legislature and called himself the “most pro-life governor in America.”

cincinnati edition
Jim Nolan / WVXU

The Kentucky General Assembly wraps-up its session this week. Governor Matt Bevin has already signed dozens of bills into law and issued two vetoes this legislative session.

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