African-Americans

Ambriehl Crutchfield / WVXU

On the last Sunday in March, a dozen Revelation Baptist Church worshippers are wearing royal purple accents as they bounce between aisles making sure the sanctuary is ready for its final day of service in the West End.

Courtesy of Center for Closing the Health Gap

Black women have the highest mortality rates when it comes to a lot of diseases despite in some cases being less likely to have those diseases in the first place. Research shows stress and race play a key role in affecting outcomes. The Center for Closing the Health Gap is starting a movement to reduce those numbers.

students
Pixabay

New research shows that a lack of diversity in the classroom continues to impact students, culturally and academically, but that little is being done to improve the recruitment and retention of black male teachers.

Business Is Booming For Black Entrepreneurs In Cincinnati

Sep 10, 2019
Ambriehl Crutchfield / WVXU

Fortune 500 companies, craft breweries and eateries tend to dominate business coverage of Cincinnati. But Essence magazine says the Queen City is the fastest growing economic power in the Midwest—in particular, minority businesses are booming, especially if you're black, the magazine says.

equal pay
Pixabay

Aug. 22 is Black Women's Equal Pay Day. That's the day in 2019 that symbolizes how much longer black women have to work before their wages catch up to what white men were paid in 2018.

Courtesy of My Black Family Reunion

The 31st Black Family Reunion is this weekend. While the annual celebration has disappeared from other communities, local organizers say it's going strong here.

herbert bane
Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Cincinnati's first African American firefighter died at his home in the Philippines earlier this year. Herbert Bane's passing didn't go unnoticed here.

minority business
Pixabay

The income disparity between African Americans and whites in Cincinnati is vast. Only 18% of businesses are black-owned, according to the State of Black Cincinnati report – a jarring statistic for a city whose population is 43% black. In other areas, black Cincinnatians fall behind their white peers in education, employment and income. Now, through a number of initiatives, efforts are underway to increase access to early childhood education, job training and other support mechanisms in an attempt to level the playing field.

Some say, though, those efforts still aren't enough.

Tuesday marks the first-ever meeting of the Ohio Black Maternal Health Caucus.

Courtesy of Will Jones

An African and hip-hop fusion cultural show will be showcasing hair on Sunday. Afro Swag brings together live performances and hairstyles to celebrate black hair.

Pixabay

Hamilton County is reporting 2018 saw a 50-year low in the number of babies dying before their first birthday. Cradle Cincinnati says there were 92 deaths last year, down from 97 in 2017.

pregnancy
Pixabay

Cincinnati nonprofits are joining a national conversation about systematic racism in the health care industry.

Doctors from Ohio State University are working to bring more black men into the medical field, which they say will also lead to better outcomes for patients in underserved communities.

Some doctors see access to birth control as a tool in the fight to decrease maternal and infant mortality. Indiana has one of the nation’s worst rates of new mothers and infants dying, and those rates are even worse for black women.

But a history of abuse has led to distrust of health care professionals in communities of color. 

chuck harmon
Al Behrman / AP

Seven years after Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in Major League Baseball, a 29-year-old utility player from Indiana named Chuck Harmon became the first African-American to play for the Cincinnati Reds.

The 16-member Legislative Black Caucus wants to create a permanent 30-member bipartisan committee appointed by the governor, which would undertake a comprehensive study on the contributions African-Americans have made to Ohio and the way the state’s laws and policies have affected them.

Courtesy Center for Closing the Health Gap

The Center for Closing the Health Gap will launch the Black Women's Health Initiative early next year. It will be crafted from focus group results being released Tuesday evening.

Becca Russo / Cradle Cincinnati

Ohio's infant mortality rate remains higher than the national average. The rate of African-American babies dying before their first birthdays is three times that of white babies.

Ceera Moseby is a first-time mom and due early next year. Her pregnancy has been smooth so far. Still, the young, healthy Indianapolis woman has cause for concern.

“Me being a black woman, I am higher risk for death in that hospital," the 20-year-old said.

ferguson protests
Charlie Riedel / AP

In her book White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide, writer Carol Anderson argues that the threat of black advancement is what fuels white rage.

History of Black-Owned Businesses in Walnut Hills

Apr 26, 2018
The Cincinnati Enquirer

One of the first African-American business districts in Cincinnati was Walnut Hills. The Lane Theological Seminary, owned by Dr. Lyman Beecher, father of Harriet Beecher Stowe, began leasing plots of land to African-Americans in the 1840s.

Provided

The Beyond Civility project allows citizens and civic leaders to meet and explore the barriers and bridges to effective dialogue. At Beyond Civility's Back-to-Back programs, high profile advocates of opposing positions on a legal or social issue agree to speak convincingly on behalf of the other side’s views. It's a challenging exercise, but one that fosters understanding and respect for those who hold different viewpoints.

Michael E. Keating

A young black man from Glendale, whose remains lay in Springfield Township's Beech Grove Cemetery, is a symbol of how the contributions of African-American soldiers in World War I were nearly forgotten.

Wikimedia Commons

World War I began in Europe on July 28, 1914, but the United States did not enter the war until April 6, 1917. More than 17 million military personnel and civilians died, and another 20 million were wounded, in what was once known as "the war to end all wars." American deaths totaled more than 116,000.

Provided

Former Cincinnati Mayor Dwight Tillery, currently president of the Center for Closing the Health Gap, is organizing the Black Agenda Cincinnati  summit to look at and develop solutions for challenges facing the African-American community. The day-long summit will be held June 11 at Woodward High School. Joining us to discuss the Black Agenda Cincinnati summit are Word of Deliverance Ministries for the World Senior Pastor and President of the Greater Cincinnati Chapter of the National Action Network, Bishop Bobby Hilton; and Center for Closing the Health Gap Founder and President, Dwight Tillery.

adlawcolorado.com

Last November, the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center hosted the program Manhood to Brotherhood: An intergenerational discussion on the ideals of manhood and brotherhood from an authentic African American male perspective.

There’s one thing you can say for certain about the small-government, libertarian-leaning junior senator from Kentucky, Rand Paul, who (presumably) would like to be the next president of the United States.

He doesn’t shy away from a tough crowd.

Paul did it last year when he made a speech before a somewhat less than receptive crowd at Howard University, the historically black college in Washington, D.C.