Amy Murray

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Cincinnati City Council officially has a new member. Republican Elizabeth "Betsy" Sundermann was sworn in Wednesday evening after being appointed to replace Amy Murray, who is leaving to take a job in D.C.

christopher smitherman amy murray jeff pastor
Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Cincinnati Council Member Amy Murrray announced Tuesday she'll officially resign following the regular weekly council meeting Wednesday evening.

ce friday
Jim Nolan / WVXU

Another week of news is in the books, so Cincinnati Edition gathers local journalists to talk about the big headlines from recent days.

amy murray
Courtesy of WCPO

A lot of folks in and around Cincinnati politics have their shorts all bunched up worrying about who is going to take Republican Amy Murray's place on Cincinnati City Council when she leaves next month to take a job in Donald Trump's Department of Defense. Frankly, I can't even pretend to get worked up about it.

City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati Council Member Amy Murray is resigning her seat for a job in Washington, D.C.

steve chabot
Gary Landers / AP

I've got good news and bad news for Steve Chabot, the Westwood Republican who presumably is running for a 12th two-year term in the U.S. House next year.

Courtesy of The Plush Family

It's been one year since Seven Hills student Kyle Plush died in his minivan in the school's parking lot. Plush became trapped and suffocated when the seat in his Honda minivan flipped over on him. He was 16. While trapped, he made two 911 calls, but help never came.

cincinnati council chambers
Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Cincinnati Council has approved an ordinance prohibiting employers from asking the salary history of job applicants. The goal is to address pay inequities between men and women.

vote
John Minchillo / AP

Cincinnati Council has OK'd a motion asking city administrators to study making Election Day in November a paid holiday for city workers. A similar ordinance for workers to trade Election Day for President's Day was held on the agenda.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

When you call 911 from a mobile phone, the operator knows your phone number and a rough idea of your location. If you sign up with Smart911, as Cincinnati and Hamilton County officials are encouraging you do, the dispatcher will have access to all kinds of personal and medical information that first responders might need to know in an emergency.

cincinnati edition
Jim Nolan / WVXU

Cincinnati City Council approves the city's $407 million operating budget for the new fiscal year that starts Sunday. Councilwoman Amy Murray shares what she learned at a national emergency communications conference as two firms continue their reviews of Cincinnati's 911 system following the tragic death of Kyle Plush. Mayor Cranley vetoes a proposed streetcar congestion fix. City officials narrow the possible sites for the police department's new District Five headquarters. And it's a turbulent time for some of the major companies headquartered in Cincinnati.   

We're not here to say that the pairing of U.S. Rep. Jim Renacci and Cincinnati council member Amy Murray is not going to work.  

Howard Wilkinson / WVXU

Updated 1 p.m.

Republican Cincinnati council member Amy Murray is teaming up with gubernatorial candidate Jim Renacci as his running mate.

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

  

Many Cincinnati residents never thought the day would come, some never wanted it to come. But after years of planning, construction, debates and political battles, the day is finally here. 

Wikimedia Commons

Update: The meeting to pitch Cincinnati for the 2016 GOP National Convention has been postponed, see tweet:

Taft Stettinius & Hollister website

Two Cincinnati Council Members are complaining about this week's demotion of John Curp from city solicitor to chief counsel for MSD and the Water Works. 

P.G. Sittenfeld and Chris Seelbach questioned Interim City Manager Scott Stiles about the personnel move he announced Tuesday in a memo.  Seelbach said he thinks Stiles made his decision based on the wishes of Mayor John Cranley or perhaps some council members.

"To me it just seems incredibly fishy, incredibly political and incredibly wrong and against our city charter," Seelbach said.

Sarah Ramsey

Cincinnati council member Laure Quinlivan told the Hamilton County Board of Elections this morning not to conduct a recount of the 859-vote difference between her and Republican Amy Murray.

Quinlivan, a Democrat who finished 10th and out of the running for one of nine council seats, was entitled to a recount because the difference between her and Murray was less than one-half of one percent.

Sarah Ramsey

An automatic recount is warranted in the race for the ninth and final Cincinnati City Council seat between Republican Amy Murray and Democrat Laure Quinlivan, but it is up to Quinlivan whether the recount will go forward.

In the official count by the Hamilton County Board of Elections done this week, Murray led Quinlivan by 859 votes – within the one-half percent difference that triggers an automatic recount.

But Sally Krisel, the deputy director of the board of elections, said Quinlivan could ask the board not to do the recount.

One thing is certain in this year’s Cincinnati City Council election – there will be at least one new member taking office on Dec. 1.

Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls is running for mayor; and that opens her seat to one of the 13 challengers in a field of 21 candidates, which includes all eight incumbents.

Amy Murray - who served as an appointed Cincinnati City Council member in 2011 before losing her seat in that year's election - has become the first non-incumbent Republican to declare her council candidacy.

Murray, of Hyde Park, will kick off her campaign Wednesday with a 7 p.m. gathering at Price Hill Chili at 4920 Glenway Ave.

She first ran for council in 2009, failing to win one of the nine spots on council. But, in January 2011, after then-council member Chris Monzel became a Hamilton County commissioner, Murray was appointed to his council seat.