atomic bomb

nagasaki atomic cloud
Courtesy / U.S. Office for Emergency Management Office of War Information

On August 6, 1945, during World War II, an American B-29 dropped the atomic bomb over the Japanese city of Hiroshima. The explosion wiped out 90 percent of the city and immediately killed 80,000 people. Tens of thousands more would later die of radiation exposure. Three days later, another atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, killing an estimated 40,000 people. Japan surrendered on August 15.

U.S. Air Force

Seven decades after the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the son of the man who flew the second A-bomb mission is finally getting the chance to tour his father's B-29 Bockscar.

"The Girls of Atomic City"

May 17, 2013

Just off I-40, west of Knoxville, Tennessee, drivers note the exit signs for Oak Ridge and, probably, think very little of it. But this one-time secret city, a Manhattan Project site, employed thousands of small-town southern women during World War II to work on the atomic bomb. A new book, The Girls of Atomic City: The Untold Story of the Women Who Helped Win World War II, shares interviews and personal stories of some of these women in a fascinating tale of secrecy, first-time independence, even romance. Author Denise Kiernan joins Mark Perzel to talk about these extraordinary women from an extraordinary time.