baseball history

After several months closed for renovation and the installation of new technologies and exhibits, the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame and Museum is ready to re-open, appropriately enough, on Opening Day, March 28. 

Chasing Dreams: Baseball & Becoming American is a new multi-media exhibition that melds the story of America's pastime, baseball, with the story of American Jewish immigration and integration. 

On This Opening Day, A Look At "Lost Ballparks"

Apr 3, 2017
Amazon.com

From the days of wooden bleachers and playing fields put together in a matter of weeks for a few thousand dollars to today’s massive stadiums that can run into the billions to build, the design of the ballpark has been ever evolving. 

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Reds player William Hoy lost his hearing at age three due to meningitis. He not only grew up to be one of the greatest and most beloved baseball players of his time, he changed the way the game was played forever.

Dallas Morning News Theater Critic Nancy Churnin recently published a children's book about the Reds hall of famer: The William Hoy Story: How a Deaf Baseball Player Changed the Game. WVXU's Howard Wilkinson talked with her about the life and career of William "Dummy" Hoy. 

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Government offices and banks were closed for Presidents' Day.  But the Reds Hall of Fame was still open, and education manager Ken Freeman says American Presidents have had a lengthy connection with Major League Baseball.

The first sitting President to attend a baseball game was North Bend, Ohio native Benjamin Harrison, in 1892.  (The Reds beat the Senators, 7-4, in 11 innings.)