bike share

Tana Weingartner/WVXU

    

Red Bike officially got rolling in 2014 as a way to provide a low-cost, healthy and green transportation option for Greater Cincinnati.  

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

The popular bike sharing program, Red Bike, operational in Cincinnati for four months, now has its sights on Covington, Newport and Bellevue.

Executive Director Jason Barron says Northern Kentucky residents are excited about the possibility and are trying to find the funding.

louisvillemegacavern.com

Ten stories underground in an old Louisville limestone cavern, hundreds of bikers will converge Monday on what is being billed as the only underground bike park in the world.

The Mega Underground Bike Park suggests advance reservations for the soft opening. The park's website says it is 320,000 square feet and has 45 trails.  Bike rentals will be available beginning in March or April.

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City of Dayton

Following in Cincinnati's trail, Dayton is getting a bike share program.

City Commissioners Wednesday approved the final piece of a financial agreement to support the program.

The Greater Dayton Regional Transit Authority will operate and maintain the system. Plans call for about 225 bikes and 22 stations located within a two-mile radius of downtown. The bikes will be "RTA-green."

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Installation is underway for Cincinnati's newest transportation option, bike sharing. The first bike share station is going up on the southeast corner of Fountain Square.

Cincinnati's program, Red Bike, is so named because of the bright red color of all the bikes. The bikes should be available for rental in September. Crews are building 35 stations with 260 bikes in Downtown, Over-the-Rhine and Uptown. A second phase reaching into Northern Kentucky could possibly launch next year.

Michael Keating

Cincinnati Council is saying 'yes' to bike sharing and 'no' to a 7.5 percent water rate hike.

Council agreed to raise water rates for Greater Cincinnati Water Works customers but only by four percent, under a compromise authored by Vice Mayor David Mann.

Council member Yvette Simpson opposed the compromise saying four percent now will only lead to an even bigger increase next year.

Fellow Council member Wendell Young says if that's the case next year, he'll vote "no." But he says a "yes" vote now sends a signal to the leadership at Water Works.