body cameras

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

The Cincinnati Police Department is in the middle of a major technology upgrade. That includes new body cameras, updated Tasers and replacing in-car video recording systems.

Courtesy of Axon

Officers in Cincinnati Police District 3 have already been trying out new body-worn cameras from Axon Enterprise, Inc. The department Tuesday announced it is getting more than 1,000 Axon Body 3 next generation cameras. Axon says Cincinnati is the first major city agency to use the cameras.

Jay Hanselman/WVXU

As more police departments implement body cameras there are new questions about whether the footage is public record and how best to ensure transparency and accountability while protecting crime victims.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Body cameras are coming to the Hamilton County Sheriff's Office two years after first proposed. Commissioners are expected to approve spending $125,000 to match a Department of Justice grant. 

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Cincinnati Police Officer Orlando Smith, a 22-year veteran of the department, has long advocated for body cameras. After a Wednesday news conference announcing their rollout, Smith showed off his camera which is mounted on his chest.

provided

Hamilton County Sheriff's deputies are still working without body cameras, even though a plan to purchase them was approved earlier this year.

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

The Cincinnati Police Department will begin deploying body worn cameras beginning on August 1.  The devices will start hitting the streets one district at a time through the end of the year.

The department has selected the TASER Axon Body 2 camera.  The city will initially have about 700 cameras for patrol officers.  The city is seeking funding for 400 more devices so all officers will eventually have them.

Stories Making News On Both Sides Of The River

Apr 8, 2016
Michael E. Keating

Ohio Governor John Kasich took time away from the presidential campaign trail Wednesday night to deliver his State of the State address. Cincinnati leaders are developing rules covering public access to police body cam footage. Kentucky legislators are looking for a way to resolve the commonwealth's pension problems, and the battle against the heroin epidemic continues on both sides of the river.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Hamilton County Sheriff Jim Neil wants to buy 230 body cameras for deputies.  But first he has to come up with the money.  The Sheriff's Office received a Department of Justice grant, and can use restricted funds to buy the cameras, but the service agreement and storage costs are not yet covered.

Some Still Skeptical About Increased Use of Police Body Cams

Aug 5, 2015
BodyWorn

Body cameras have been back in the news following a recent police shooting in Cincinnati.

Police departments across the state are either testing or wearing the devices and Dayton and Beavercreek are considering getting them. Equipping officers with cameras also is one of the recommendations from Governor John Kasich’s Task Force on Community-Police Relations.