Breonna Taylor

breonna taylor protest
Timothy D. Easley / AP

It was a no-knock warrant that let to the police killing of Breonna Taylor in Louisville, adding to the nationwide protests against deadly police violence. The city of Louisville vowed to end the practice. Now the city of Cincinnati may do the same.

The justice system failed Breonna Taylor, says Tamika Palmer, the mother of the emergency room technician whom police shot and killed in her own apartment in March. She says Kentucky's attorney general was not up to the job of achieving justice for Taylor.

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron says his office determined that two of the three officers who fired their weapons were justified when they fatally shot Breonna Taylor.

Officer Myles Cosgrove and Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly were returning fire and within their rights to defend themselves, according to Cameron, who spoke in Frankfort Wednesday afternoon at the Kentucky History Center shortly after a grand jury announced it was charging only one of the officers involved in Taylor’s death.

The grand jury indicted former Louisville Metro Police officer Brett Hankison on three counts of wanton endangerment, all connected to Hankison firing his gun and endangering Taylor’s neighbors. None of the counts are for firing into Taylor’s apartment, or directly linked to her death.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Demonstrators took to the streets of Cincinnati Wednesday night to protest the grand jury decision in the death of Breonna Taylor in Louisville. One officer was charged with wanton endangerment for firing his weapon into neighboring apartments. Two other officers were not charged.

Updated at 7:20 p.m. ET

Following months of outrage, activism and anticipation, a Kentucky grand jury has decided to indict one of the three Louisville Metro Police Department officers involved in the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor in March.

Brett Hankison, who was terminated in June, has been charged with three counts of wanton endangerment over shooting into neighboring apartments. Bond was set at $15,000.

Greg Fischer, the mayor of Louisville, Ky., said Tuesday he has declared a state of emergency for the city "due to the potential for civil unrest."

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron is poised to announce whether his office will bring charges against the police officers who fatally shot 26-year-old Breonna Taylor during a botched narcotics raid at her home on March 13.

The mayor reiterated he has no insight about when Cameron's decision will be announced, but he said the city must be prepared.

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer declared a state of emergency Tuesday pending an announcement by Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron regarding the Breonna Taylor case.

Updated at 2:53 p.m. ET

The city of Louisville, Ky., announced a $12 million settlement Tuesday in a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the family of Breonna Taylor.

The settlement also includes a series of police reforms to be adopted by the Louisville Metro Police Department, including establishing a housing incentive program to encourage officers to live in low-income neighborhoods within the city.

Other changes to police tactics include creating a clearer command structure when executing warrants at multiple locations.

louisville protest
Dylan Lovan / AP

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer says it feels odd to announce the Kentucky Derby in September, but it's the reality of 2020 — a year when the "most exciting two minutes in sports" will go forward without spectators in the stands due the coronavirus pandemic, but crowds will gather outside the track to amplify calls to arrest and charge the officers who shot and killed Breonna Taylor.

breonnacon
Elanor Klibanoff / WFPL

Saturday marked the first day of "BreonnaCon," a series of events intended to raise awareness about the police killing of Breonna Taylor in Louisville. 

Over the course of four days, there will be barbecues, food drives and empowerment events, culminating in a march on Louisville Metro Police Department's training academy on Tuesday. 

'Breonna's Law' Would Ban No-Knock Warrants Statewide

Aug 17, 2020
Stephanie Wolf / WFPL

Kentucky State Rep. Attica Scott unveiled proposed legislation Sunday morning that would ban no-knock warrants statewide.