business

findlay market
Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Holiday traditions like visiting the Fountain Square Christmas tree and sipping hot coco while doing holiday shopping are different during the pandemic. The tree lighting was televised and online with no live spectators. Face masks have to be put on between sips. And people are opting to shop online instead of in-person, meaning some small retailers are taking a financial hit. 

With Ohio in the third week of COVID hospitalizations setting a new record each day, Gov. Mike DeWine laid out two new health orders and previewed the possibility of a limited shutdown. The announcement got mixed reviews from state lawmakers.

downtown cincinnati
Ronny Salerno / WVXU

Tri-State business leaders say they're continuing to take measures to ensure their employees and customers are safe during the pandemic. A handful gathered online Tuesday to outline steps they're taking to help slow the spread of the coronavirus.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

The second phase of a study to determine the economic impact of Black-owned businesses in the Tri-State is about to begin. The Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky African American Chamber of Commerce and the UC Economics Center are working together on this first of its kind review.

small business assistance
Tony Dejak / AP

Small businesses in Hamilton County that have been harmed during the pandemic now have a second chance to apply for funding through the Hamilton County CARES Small Business Relief Program. The second round of the program launched Monday, Aug. 24, allowing business owners to apply for grants up to $10,000.

Courtesy of Arabesque Dance Academy

Children in ballet slippers are able to practice their pliés and pirouettes at Arabesque Dance Academy in North College Hill thanks to a grant from Hamilton County's Small Business Relief Program funded by the federal CARES Act.

florence y'alls
Courtesy of BLDG

Covington-based creative firm BLDG has had a hand in some high-profile local and regional campaigns of late.

Pixabay.com

As states reopen more of the economy, one thing hasn't changed for a portion of the population: working remotely.

With the economy continuing to reopen, and COVID-19 cases continuing to rise, many are left wondering: is the worst over yet?

Dr. Zaria Davis realized women weren't getting the same level of support when they were released from prison. That is why she launched Filling the Gap, a college readiness and leadership development program for individuals returning from incarceration. Now Davis is one of 29 black entrepreneurs receiving a grant from the United Way of Greater Cincinnati to strengthen anti-poverty initiatives in the region.

Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) is calling on the Treasury Department to give local leaders greater flexibility when it comes to spending federal rescue funding.

Pixabay.com

When Toys "R" Us announced its closure in 2017, the other big box retailers didn't reap all the rewards. Independent toy stores are the ones that truly stepped in to fill a void for children and their parents.

the banks
John Minchillo / AP

An Academy Award winner is bringing real snow to The Banks in Cincinnati.

cincinnati bell
Courtesy of Cincinnati Bell

Cincinnati Bell on Monday announced it is to be acquired by Canada-based Brookfield Infrastructure, a global company with assets in utilities, transport and energy and data infrastructure. The deal is valued at approximately $2.6 billion, including debt.

Pixabay

The Cincinnati Minority Business Accelerator is getting a $450,000 grant to help entrepreneurs who have been systemically left behind.

minority business
Pixabay

The income disparity between African Americans and whites in Cincinnati is vast. Only 18% of businesses are black-owned, according to the State of Black Cincinnati report – a jarring statistic for a city whose population is 43% black. In other areas, black Cincinnatians fall behind their white peers in education, employment and income. Now, through a number of initiatives, efforts are underway to increase access to early childhood education, job training and other support mechanisms in an attempt to level the playing field.

Some say, though, those efforts still aren't enough.

women's initiative
Courtesy of NKY Chamber of Commerce

The Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce Women’s Initiative was created to inspire businesswomen in our region to connect, grow and achieve. The organization's upcoming annual breakfast is one of the largest professional development and networking events of the year.

Courtesy of Northern Kentucky University

The former president and CEO of REDI Cincinnati is announcing her plans for the future. Johnna Reeder Kleymeyer is taking over as interim dean of the Haile/US Bank College of Business at Northern Kentucky University.

Making Businesses More Diverse By Design

Oct 17, 2018
diversity in business
Pixabay

Our region may be making progress when it comes to diversity and inclusion, but there's a long way to go.

Japan and the United States have a long history of not only economic competition, but also cultural exchange. In the U.S., for instance, sushi and anime are popular. And the Japanese long ago adopted baseball and jazz. If that’s old news to you, here’s one America-to-Japan export that might surprise you: U.S. convenience stores.

This story is about one of those stores: an iconic Ohio chain that went extinct here decades ago, only to become one of the most ubiquitous convenience store brands in Japan.

Amid rising trade tensions between China and the Trump administration, Chinese officials met with Ohio business leaders in Columbus on Wednesday for a business and policy luncheon.

Editor's note: The name of the industry group was incorrect in the earlier version of this story.

Tens of billions of dollars in investment could be coming to northeast Ohio and the surrounding region in the next five years in the polymer, plastics and paint industries

Michael Keating / WVXU

It was a good year in 2017 for startups in Ohio. According to VentureOhio, more than $470 million in venture capital was invested statewide. So how is the Cincinnati startup market looking in 2018? We've seen strong growth in recent years with an explosion of craft breweries, tech startups, and a dozen business accelerators to help incubate and launch new ventures. But has the market slowed?

Social Enterprises Starting To Grow In Russia

May 8, 2018
Impact Hub in Moscow

Social enterprises utilize a combination of for-profit and non-profit-based methods for improving society. Rather than depend on charitable donations, they rely on the income earned from sales or services. And they reinvest income to maintain long-term financial sustainability. This model has become popular in several cities throughout the United States, including here in Greater Cincinnati.

But can social entrepreneurs and social enterprises be successful in Russia?

A proposed law that would seek to stop discrimination for LGBTQ people is seeing a new wave of support. Business groups say sexual orientation and gender identification should be considered protected classes in Ohio.

Employers could be getting a big rebate if the Board of Directors for the Ohio Bureau of Worker’s Compensation approves it. 

Business groups are calling on lawmakers to pass a bill that would add sexual orientation and gender identity as protected classes in discrimination laws. The coalition of companies sees added benefits going beyond civil rights.

The number of African American-owned businesses has fallen sharply in Yellow Springs from its peak four decades ago. Only a handful remain in the village.

Antioch College History Professor Kevin McGruder credits some of the shift to rising college-graduation rates among many blacks in Yellow Springs.

"So, as black people have had access to more college they seek more opportunities and jobs they can get with those degrees than in opening up a store," McGruder says.

NKY Chamber Women's Initiative And Mentoring

Jan 18, 2018
Provided

The Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce Women’s Initiative Annual Breakfast takes place next Wednesday, January 24. Dr. Debra Clary, corporate director for the Leadership Institute at Humana, Inc. will be the keynote speaker at the breakfast, one of the largest professional development and networking events of the year

Living A More Balanced And Satisfying Life

Jun 19, 2017
amazon.com

 

After making partner at an accounting firm at the age of 32, Amy Vetter says she had an inner crisis on whether that was the right career path for her. Turning to yoga, she began exploring her values and creativity to reshape her outlook on work and life.

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