Cincinnati Police Department

Provided / City of Cincinnati

A 26-year Cincinnati Police Department veteran is being promoted to assistant chief.  

City Manager Harry Black announced Tuesday Capt. Eliot Isaac will fill the position.

Some Columbus mounted patrol officers are coming to Cincinnati to help with security during All-Star Game events.  

The Cincinnati Police Department said they will be on patrol Saturday and Tuesday.  

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Some Cincinnati police officers will be working a lot this weekend and early next week as part of the All-Star festivities.  

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley is planning to speak at the twice-daily roll calls for officers at the beginning of their shifts.  

Michael E. Keating / WVXU

The Cincinnati Police Department is a step closer to getting some technology upgrades for its police cruisers.

City Council voted Wednesday to use $2 million from last year's city budget surplus for information technology equipment.  

Michael E. Keating / WVXU

The full Cincinnati Council will likely vote Wednesday on a proposal to start a new police training class on January 3rd. 

Council's Law and Public Safety Committee approved the plan Tuesday.

It will have at least 40 recruits and that number could grow to 55 if the city receives a federal COPS hiring grant.  

Glenn Hartong / Pool Photographer

A city overwhelmed by grief but inspired by his service and courage came together Friday to lay fallen Police Officer Sonny Kim to rest. 

The funeral service for the 27-year veteran of the Cincinnati Police Department drew about 7,000 people - including hundreds of police officers from around the country - to the Cintas Center on the Xavier University campus to remember a loving husband and father who took on a dangerous job that, in the end, cost him his life.

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

The Cincinnati Police Department has 22 new graduates who are ready to start their careers in the city.  

Members of the 105th recruit class received their commissions Friday during a ceremony at Cincinnati Christian University.

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Cincinnati Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell, along with his district commanders and assistant chiefs, will hold a series of community meetings Thursday and Friday with community members aimed at stemming a rising tide of gun violence in the city.

Michael Keating

Cincinnati’s Human Resources Department is getting ready to launch a “climate assessment” process to review internal communication and employee morale within the Cincinnati Police Department.

Michael E. Keating / WVXU

Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black is asking Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell for a 90-day action plan to reduce violence in the city.  Black wants the proposal by Friday.

Michael E. Keating / WVXU

Cincinnati's police chief and the head of the police union are at odds about allowing civilians to process crime scenes.  

Ann Thompson / WVXU

The head of Cincinnati's police union says the number of officers working in the city's police districts is bare bones.

Michael E. Keating / WVXU

The Cincinnati Police Department reports it needs a recruit class for each of the next two to three years to maintain its staffing level.

The request was made in the department's budget presentation Monday to a Council committee. Budget manager Ella Topham explained how it would work.

"We'd like to target that recruit class to begin in February each year, and for the next two or three years that would be probably a 30 member recruit class," Topham said.

The department wants to maintain a sworn strength of 1,000 officers.

A Cincinnati council committee continues a debate about whether the city's police chief should be able to commission private police officers.

It allows those individuals to perform special police duties and they typically work security details for businesses and organizations.

Jay Hanselman

The Cincinnati Police Department is celebrating the completion of its first recruit class in more than six years.  

56 officers and one firefighter who took the 26-week training courses received their commissions Friday during a ceremony in Downtown Cincinnati at The Masonic Center.  They will now spend the next 13 weeks with training officers.  

The class valedictorian was James Hutchings, who is currently a Cincinnati Firefighter.  He went thru police training to be a sworn officer inside the fire department.  Hutchings had this advice to his fellow graduates.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati has 19 new police officers. The department's first class of lateral transfer recruits in more than six years was sworn in today. The officers all came from other Ohio agencies but still had to go through the city's training process. Chief Jeffrey Blackwell calls today's graduation exciting.

The new officers will hit the ground running with their first duty assignment working the Cincinnati Reds game on Saturday. They'll be paired with field training officers on Sunday and begin working in their assigned districts.

Homeless children, teens and young adults are a rising concern for police and social workers in Hamilton County.

Lighthouse Youth Services CEO Bob Mecum says homeless kids used to mainly be unhappy runaways.

"Today we're seeing kids who are, for the most part, long-term victims of poverty, long-term victims of neglect, and physical and sexual abuse," says Mecum.

Addiction is another major problem. Mecum says heroin use today is unprecedented and often passed down to children by their parents.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

Cincinnati is halfway through a 90-day program of barricading parts of West McMicken Street in the city to reduce prostitution and human trafficking activities.  

District One Police Captain Michael John said there has been a disruption in the cruising related to the offenses.

Cincinnati police are erecting temporary barricades on portions of McMicken Street to keep people from cruising for prostitutes in a part of the city where sex trafficking has been rampant.

In order to combat increasing prostitution offenses on McMicken Street from Over-the-Rhine through the Clifton Heights and University Heights area, the Cincinnati police department began erecting temporary barricades on the street today to curb the cruising for prostitutes there.

Provided

Cincinnati's Police Chief say officers responded appropriately Monday during an incident in which the suspect was fatally shot by police.

Chief Jeffrey Blackwell says officers went to the Walnut Hills home of Gregory Sanders after he called 911 saying he'd killed his mother.

"We are, at this point, pretty certain everything was above board; that every division policy was followed, says Blackwell. "The fact is that they were forced to use deadly force by Mr. Gregory Sanders who came out of the house with a rifle."

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