City of Cincinnati

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Permaculture is a system of agricultural and social design principles centered around working with nature, instead of against it, to foster sustainable systems and lifestyles.

Howard Wilkinson

The Hamilton County Board of Elections Monday morning rejected a challenge to the wording of a Cincinnati charter amendment that would create a one mill tax for city parks.

 The city of Cincinnati’s 24-member Charter Review Task Force, given the task of studying the city’s ancient charter and recommending changes, labored for 18 months doing exactly what they were asked to do.

But, as the old saying goes, they labored mightily, and brought forth a mouse.

University of Cincinnati President Santa Ono and UC Police Chief Jason Goodrich met Monday with the Cincinnati city manager's advisory group.  

It meets monthly on police/community relations.  The city offered university officials a chance to talk with the group after a UC police officer shot and killed a man during a traffic stop July 19.  

Ann Thompson / WVXU

Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters now has the police report in the fatal shooting of a motorist by a UC officer. It's the video of the incident that is causing some controversy and the prosecutor says he's not going to release it.


    

Last month Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black released his proposed city biennial budget for fiscal years 2016 and 2017. Now, after holding public hearings and listening to citizen comments, council members are discussing possible changes to the proposed budget, with the full council scheduled to vote on the final spending plan June 17.

Courtesy WCPO

Mayor John Cranley, City Manager Harry S. Black, and Cincinnati Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell stood alongside community members to unveil the Police Department’s Summer Safety Initiative Plan this morning. City Manager Harry Black is fully supportive of the plan, which includes personnel redeployment, community and youth outreach initiatives, and enhanced C.I.R.V capacity.

Provided / City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati Assistant City Manager Scott Stiles is a finalist for the city manager's position in Garden Grove, California, and will leave Cincinnati City Hall on July 17 after 27 years of service.

  A new program is underway in Cincinnati that officials say will make city government faster, more effective and smarter while saving money.

Courtesy of City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati’s Public Services Department is about to get tough on those residents who put out “improperly prepared” trash for pick-up.

  The Cincinnati charter, adopted by voters in 1926, is the city’'s constitution. It governs every aspect of how Cincinnati is governed and how it operates. The 24-member Cincinnati Charter Review Task Force has been reviewing the charter over the past year.

Last month Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black appointed Thomas B. Corey as the city’'s Economic Inclusion Executive Project Director. Mr. Corey will oversee the city’'s newly-formed Department of Economic Inclusion. Harry Black and Thomas Corey join us to discuss the city'’s redefined efforts to improve the local economy by boosting opportunities for minority and women-owned businesses.

Bill Rinhart/WVXU

City officials say tests on debris from a three-story building on West Court Street that collapsed Saturday night showed no asbestos removal is necessary in the clean-up.

City officials say, the owner may now remove all the debris so ordinary traffic can be resumed on West Court Street. The city has ordered the owner, Historic Limited Liability Company, to finish the clean-up and stabilize the remaining building.

City officials say the work must be supervised by a professional architect or engineer hired by the owner.

Sarah Ramsey

Cincinnati’s “Holiday Food for Fines” program collected 3,580 canned foods for the Freestore Foodbank and resulted in $12,780 in parking fines collected.

The program gave people with outstanding parking tickets a chance to have the late fees waived in exchange for 10 donated canned goods.

According to City Manager Harry Black, 286 people took advantage of the city’s offer; and, in some cases, people donated more than the required 10 cans of food. The people who participated were required to make a payment of $45 in addition to donating the canned food.

Provided

The city of Cincinnati has a new city solicitor, Paula Boggs Muething, and a new trade and  development director, Oscar Bedolla, city manager Harry Black announced Monday.

Boggs Muething is currently general counsel and vice president of community development revitalization at the Port of Greater Cincinnati Development Authority. Before that, she served as a senior assistant city solicitor.

Bedolla has worked in the private sector on large development projects.

Howard Wilkinson

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley promised a lot of action in his first State of the City address Thursday night - less gun violence, a greater emphasis on basic services to the neighborhoods and a reduction in the number of Cincinnati residents living in poverty, among other things.

And, Cranley promised, a city that is even more fun to live in than it is now. He went so far as to say he is appointing an unpaid, volunteer “Commissioner of Fun” for the city.

The developer and architect of the planned General Electric Global Operations Center showed preliminary drawings to Cincinnati's Urban Design Review Board, and board members were not impressed.

The five board members said they didn’t believe the architectural drawings of the 10-story building to be constructed on The Banks were distinctive enough; and that the building was too plain.

But, in the end, there is nothing the Urban Design Review Board can do about it.

A federal magistrate ruled this morning that Cincinnati's responsible bidder ordinance is invalid and that Hamilton County makes the rules for the Metropolitan Sewer District (MSD).

The county owns the sewer system, but the city operates it.

The city and the county have been fighting for more than two years over the responsible bidder ordinance, which would force MSD contractors to have apprentice programs and pay into a pre-apprenticeship fund. Unions favor the ordinance, because many of them have apprentice programs.

  The mayor of a city can be considered its chief executive officer. But the power that office holds is determined by a city’s rules or charter, which defines what a mayor can, and cannot, do. Cincinnati adopted a “strong mayor” system of government 15 years ago. Now Cincinnati Councilman Christopher Smitherman is exploring another change, to what some call an “executive mayor” system.

john cranley
City of Cincinnati

  Sworn in as mayor just under five months ago, John Cranley fought and lost the streetcar battle, successfully stopped the city’s parking lease agreement, proposed a fix for city’s pension plan and called for Cincinnati to be more immigrant friendly. Mayor Cranley sat down with Jay Hanselman to discuss those and other issues, and the challenges and opportunities he sees in the city’s future.

 

Hamilton County will go to federal court to try to settle a dispute with the city of Cincinnati over hiring practices for a massive Metropolitan Sewer District (MSD) project.

Commission president Chris Monzel said the county will file its suit next week in U.S. District Court here.

"We're going to ask the court to weigh in on the relationship between the city and the county, particuarly on procurement issues,'' Monzel said.

The county owns MSD, but the city of Cincinnati operates it.

At issue is whether the county or the city gets to set policy for MSD.

Provided, City of Cincinnati

 

Mark Heyne / WVXU

The Ohio Board of Tax Appeals says the City of Cincinnati does not have to pay property taxes on city-owned golf courses.

The ruling comes after the city appealed a decision by the Ohio Tax Commissioner who had said otherwise.

The tax commissioner had said the golf courses were subject to tax because they are operated by a private, for-profit company. The city says the Tax Appeals Board's ruling will save the city $450,000.

The Tax Commissioner can appeal to the state Supreme Court.

Cincinnati renews quest for faster broadband

Mar 4, 2014

Cincinnati is going to pursue Google Fiber--a service said to be up to 100 times faster than average broadband speeds--as a way to make the city's tech infrastructure more competitive.  Council member P.G. Sittenfeld made the announcement Tuesday at Roadtrippers, one of the companies supporting the effort.

James Fischer, CEO of Roadtrippers, made the case for faster broadband from his company's perspective.

Tana Weingartner / WVXU

 UPDATE:  The OKI board unanimously approved the funding plan at its meeting Thursday morning.

The OKI Regional Council of Governments board will vote Thursday on a first-of-its kind financing plan to rebuild the Interstate 71/Martin Luther King interchange.

OKI Director Mark Policinski says the plan calls for a loan from the state infrastructure bank.

Jay Hanselman

Mayor Mark Mallory, quickly coming to the close of his eight years as Cincinnati mayor, used a combination of serious talk, comedic one-liners, videos and slide shows Tuesday night to make the case that he has helped turned a struggling city around.

Before a crowd of about 200 invited guests on a set dressed like a living room at Over-the-Rhine’s Ensemble Theatre, Mallory talked for an hour and five minutes about the legacy he leaves when he vacates the mayor’s office Dec. 1.

Provided

John Cranley, the 38-year-old Democrat elected to four terms on Cincinnati City Council from 2001 through 2007, has become the first announced candidate for Cincinnati mayor in the 2013 election.

The present mayor, Mark Mallory, can't run again because of the city's term limits law, which limits the mayor to two four-year terms.

Cincinnati is considering outsourcing its parking operations.

Jay Hanselman

The president of Duke Energy says the company will not provide a construction schedule for moving its wires and pipes for the city’s streetcar project until the two sides reach a deal on an operating agreement. 

Julie Janson expressed her concerns in an October 10th letter to City Manager Milton Dohoney, Jr.

Janson said the operating agreement must allow the company to have immediate access to equipment during emergencies and enough time to resolve any issues. 

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