City spending

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Cincinnati Council could vote in two weeks on how to spend $20.3 million that was carried over from the budget that ended June 30.

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Bill Rinehart / WVXU

The full Cincinnati City Council has approved the budget for the new fiscal year which starts July 1.

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

The full Cincinnati City Council is expected to take a series of votes Wednesday that will enact a budget for the new fiscal year starting July 1.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Cincinnati Council's Budget and Finance Committee will meet Tuesday afternoon to debate and discuss motions to make changes to the budget proposed by City Manager Patrick Duhaney and Mayor John Cranley.

council budget meeting
Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Cincinnati City Council's final public hearing Thursday night on the city budget ended in chaos.

Provided / City of Cincinnati

About 200 people addressed a Cincinnati council committee Tuesday night about the new city budget for the fiscal year starting July 1.

Jennifer Merritt / WVXU

Hundreds of people have already signed up to participate in public hearings about Cincinnati's budget. Those sessions start Tuesday evening and will now conclude with a potential 12-hour meeting Friday.

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Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Cincinnati City Manager Patrick Duhaney has released his budget for the new fiscal year which starts July 1. The plan closes a $73.4 million general fund deficit without layoffs, furloughs or closing any city parks or recreation centers.

Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Cincinnati residents will have two chances next week to comment on the city manager's budget proposal for the new fiscal year starting July 1. 

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

Updated: Wednesday, 4:54 p.m.

Cincinnati officially has a city budget for the new fiscal year which starts in two weeks.  

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

It's now up to Cincinnati City Council members to make changes to the city's proposed budget for the fiscal year which starts July 1.

Michael E. Keating / WVXU

Cincinnati Police Chief Eliot Isaac warned in a memo Tuesday the department's street strength could drop below 1,000 sworn officers next year.

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Wikimedia Commons

A Cincinnati Council majority has voted to make about $2.5 million in changes to the city's general fund budget for the new fiscal year that starts Sunday.

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Bill Rinehart / WVXU

Nearly 50 people offered comments Monday night as Cincinnati City Council's Budget and Finance Committee held its first public hearing on the proposed city budget for the fiscal year that starts July 1.

City of Cincinnati

At least three Cincinnati Council members want to revisit the city's living wage ordinance to increase the hourly pay rate for part-time city employees to at least $15 per hour.

The issue was raised Monday during a budget and finance committee meeting.  The members were being asked to approve a labor agreement for a group of part-time, seasonal workers.  

City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black announced Wednesday the projected general fund budget deficit for the next fiscal year has ballooned to $25.1 million.

Earlier this year it was projected to be between $7 and $9 million.

City of Cincinnati

So far Cincinnati is not hitting the revenue projections needed to meet this year's city budget.  

Those revenues were about $2 million less than what was forecast through the end of December. Plus, income tax collections are $4.3 million below what was forecast for the fiscal year.

Cincinnati City Council has decided to keep collecting $28.9 million in property taxes to support the city's general fund budget.  

It has been at that amount for several years despite suggestions from city administrators to increase it.  

City of Cincinnati

Cincinnati City Council won't approve a new budget for another six months, but already the city manager is projecting a deficit of between $7 and $9 million.

The actual amount of the shortfall depends on city council setting the property tax rate.  

Michael E. Keating / WVXU

Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black said Wednesday the city and the Fraternal Order of Police are back at the table negotiating a new contract for the city's police officers.

The talks come after city council delayed a decision this week on Mayor John Cranley's plan to increase salaries for all union workers.

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