Cleveland Clinic

Ohio is now allowing nasal swab testing for anyone who might have COVID-19, not just those with severe symptoms.

Some labs are also offering a blood test for people who think they might have had a mild case of the disease.

This antibody test measures the body’s immune response to the coronavirus.

But the head of Cleveland Clinic’s coronavirus testing lab says these antibody tests are largely useless.

Cleveland Clinic researchers are reporting in a new study that suicide-related emergency room visits have fallen during the coronavirus pandemic.

The Clinic’s Director of Operations and Quality Improvement Officer for Emergency Services is Dr. Baruch Fertel. He says, compared to last year, psychiatric visits are down 28 percent, and visits related to suicide are down 60 percent. He says the reason could be that many people are putting off care.

Emerging data from COVID-19 cases show skin symptoms are potentially associated with coronavirus infection.

Cleveland Clinic dermatologists Drs. Sarah Young and Anthony Fernandez recently published a study detailing several common skin symptoms in COVID-19 patients, such as hives and rashes. They looked at research from Europe.

Fernandez said he's seen some of these symptoms in patients at the Cleveland Clinic as well.

The Cleveland Clinic has begun enrollment for a nationwide trial to test an anti-malarial drug’s effect on treating the coronavirus.

Cleveland Clinic Can Now Test For Coronavirus

Mar 12, 2020

Updated 5:00 p.m., Thursday, March 12, 2020

Cleveland Clinic can now test for the coronavirus without sending specimens to an outside lab.

Clinic officials called this a game changer because they can now get tests results in hours, instead of waiting days.  The clinic’s pathology lab director Brian Rubin said they are able to run about 500 specimens a day and hope to ramp up to 1000 per day by next week.

If you made a New Year's resolution to be more healthy - maybe drop some pounds - then this story is for you. A new national survey from the Cleveland Clinic shows that Americans, by and large, are concerned about their weight and worried about heart disease. But are they doing something about it? That's another story.

More than 70 percent of the roughly 1,000 adults surveyed said they were worried about their weight, but less than half had made changes to their diet in order to lose weight. And carrying those extra pounds is putting them in jeopardy of serious health problems.