CPD

Jim Nolan/WVXU

Ohio Governor John Kasich is reflective but short on policy details during his eighth and final "State of the State" speech. An Assistant Cincinnati Police Chief is forced off the force. This, in the same week an audit is revealed, questioning overtime spending by the Cincinnati Police Department, and as one CPD captain accuses top police officials of discrimination. And calls for new management of the Cincinnati Streetcar amid low ridership, breakdowns and time delays.

Jay Hanselman/WVXU

As more police departments implement body cameras there are new questions about whether the footage is public record and how best to ensure transparency and accountability while protecting crime victims.

City of Cincinnati

The Cincinnati Police Department is looking for qualified men and women who would like to join its ranks. Joining us to discuss what it takes to be a police officer for the City of Cincinnati, and the qualifications the department looks for in a candidate, are Cincinnati Police Officers Mike Schulte and Edwin Rivera.

Jay Hanselman/WVXU

Last Friday Cincinnati leaders announced a proposal to review and refresh the city's Collaborative Agreement, negotiated in 2002. The agreement was put in place following the civil unrest in 2001, after a white Cincinnati police officer, Stephen Roach, shot and killed Timothy Thomas, a 19-year-old, unarmed African-American.

Update May 10, 2016: The planned mixed-use development at Liberty and Elm streets in Over-the-Rhine will move forward. Cincinnati Council voted 8-1 in favor of the project.

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A "no-snitch" mentality and witness intimidation make it difficult to prosecute known criminals for their crimes, especially shootings and homicides. Police may have a viable suspect in a case, but often cannot charge the individual because witnesses are unwilling to come forward. 

Jay Hanselman / WVXU

The Cincinnati Police Department will begin deploying body worn cameras beginning on August 1.  The devices will start hitting the streets one district at a time through the end of the year.

The department has selected the TASER Axon Body 2 camera.  The city will initially have about 700 cameras for patrol officers.  The city is seeking funding for 400 more devices so all officers will eventually have them.

Provided, City of Cincinnati

The Cincinnati Police Department is looking for qualified men and women who would like to join its ranks. Joining us to discuss what it takes to be a police officer for the City of Cincinnati, and the qualifications the department looks for in a candidate, are Cincinnati Police Recruiting and Background Supervisor Sergeant Dominic Gulliford; Recruiting and Background Investigator, Officer Adrian Miller; and Cincinnati Police Academy Recruit Advisor, Officer Fred Gilmore

Jay Hanselman

The Cincinnati Police Department is celebrating the completion of its first recruit class in more than six years.  

56 officers and one firefighter who took the 26-week training courses received their commissions Friday during a ceremony in Downtown Cincinnati at The Masonic Center.  They will now spend the next 13 weeks with training officers.  

The class valedictorian was James Hutchings, who is currently a Cincinnati Firefighter.  He went thru police training to be a sworn officer inside the fire department.  Hutchings had this advice to his fellow graduates.