cyber security

cyber security
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Twenty-two cities in Texas. Baltimore. Atlanta. All hit by sizable ransomware attacks. One of the newer online threats results in computer systems – some including critical government data and programs – being locked up and unusable until the municipality, or business or individual pays off the attacker. But there are ways to be safe.

online privacy
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Computer and internet hackers seem to come up with new ways to steal digital information every week. We've all been warned about clicking on unfamiliar web links, putting sensitive information in emails and avoiding public Wi-Fi networks.

Ohio’s Secretary of State Frank LaRose is warning voters to be vigilant when they come across information regarding politics and government on social media, he says misinformation remains a top priority in the fight against elections meddling. 

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With the internet, smart devices and social media, kids today have access to more information and opportunities to interact with more people than ever before. And that makes them more vulnerable than ever before to online predators, cyberbullying and  exposure to inappropriate material.

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According to the Identity Theft Research Center, more than 178 million records on Americans were exposed in cyberattacks last year. Hackers target both personal users and the data systems of large corporations to steal information for use in other criminal activities, to ransom back to the owner, or to further some ideological cause.

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The full Senate is expected to take up a controversial bill called The Cyberthreat Information Sharing Act (CISA) when members return from their August recess.

Dozens of amendments will likely be added to the act, but in its present form businesses would have immunity from customer lawsuits when they hand over information about cyberthreats to other companies and to federal agencies.

  

Massive security breaches at major companies such as Target, Home Depot and Anthem make national headlines, and are certainly real cause for alarm. But more than 75% of data breaches happen to small and medium-sized businesses, since criminals always look for the easiest, most vulnerable targets. 

  

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It's not exactly 'spy school' as some headlines are claiming but the University of Cincinnati is being recognized by the National Security Agency.

Four of the school's programs are now designated as Centers of Academic Excellence in Cyber Operations. UC is one of just 13 schools in the country to receive the designation.