Dayton

Former longtime Dayton City Commissioner Joey Williams is among a handful of public officials and business owners now facing federal fraud charges.  The Department of Justice said Tuesday the charges are the result of a sweeping investigation into alleged public corruption in the city of Dayton. 

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Pixabay

By the time thousands of basketball fans get into Dayton for the First Four NCAA basketball tournament this week, illegal sex trafficking encounters will have been set up there for weeks. Savvy traffickers know events that attract lots of people are an easy way to hide their illegal activity. 

Police are on alert, but traffickers try to stay one step ahead, advertising as far away as Europe and scheduling encounters in discrete places.

The city of Dayton has filed a lawsuit against an out-of-state group that plans to hold a rally on Dayton’s Courthouse Square in May. City officials say the Honorable Sacred Knights is a paramilitary group and the rally they are planning is in violation of Ohio’s constitution.

Last month, Montgomery County, which oversees Courthouse Square, granted the Indiana group believed to be affiliated with the KKK permission to rally on May 25th.

newspaper boy
Wikimedia Commons

I had journalism on my mind at a very early age.

In fact, with my neighborhood buddy Mike Wehmeyer, I was the editor and publisher of a newspaper at the age of 13. Well, sort of a newspaper.

The last building in the historic Dayton Arcade complex has been purchased by Dayton Arcade Partners. The arm of real-estate company Cross Street Partners has acquired the Kuhns building on Main Street for $1,283,586.

The Kuhns building is the only historic Arcade property in the complex that still operates as a commercial office venue. The late-nineteenth century rustic red structure was renovated in 2007.

Owners Bob and Nancy Shiffler, with Kuhns 1883, and Dayton Arcade Partners are expected to close on the sale of the building next week.

Provided

As someone who grew up in Dayton and has called Cincinnati home since 1982, it is hard for me to imagine the mayors of the two central cities of my life talking to each other on a regular basis, much less liking each other.

Community members will get an opportunity to voice their concerns about Dayton Public Schools at a town hall meeting set for Thursday.

DPS officials say the discussion will center on parent engagement, a topic board member and DPS parent Jocelyn Rhynard has focused on during previous meetings. Rhynard is set to facilitate the discussion.

In a statement, DPS said it wants to help families learn how to get involved in their child’s education. The district also wants to establish parent teacher organization in all schools.

Dayton voters yesterday overwhelmingly voted in favor of decriminalizing minor marijuana and hashish possession.

Ballot Issue 8 passed with nearly three-quarters of the vote. 

It was an advisory election. Passage opens the door to the possibility of Dayton decriminalizing misdemeanor hashish and marijuana offenses in the future.

Changes could include reducing the financial penalties for possessing up to 100 grams of marijuana, and small quantities of hashish.

Under current law, such offenses carry a fine of $150.

Dayton’s foreign-born population has grown dramatically in recent years. While the number of immigrants is smaller than that in some other cities around the United States, people from more than 100 different countries call Dayton home.

That international diversity was on display at a special recent soccer game. The Dayton World Soccer Games is designed to help the city’s immigrant and refugee newcomers feel at home. 

Early voting is underway across Ohio for the Tuesday, November 6 elections. With the midterms approaching, WYSO producers have been talking to would-be voters around the Miami Valley. Today, we hear from some Daytonians in the city's Oregon District about what’s on their minds this election season.

Dayton woman: I’m horrified by the current administration. The immigration policy, I think, is terrifying. The ethics, the lack thereof, nepotism, a  lot of things are terrifying.

About a decade ago, a housing crisis swept the country. The crash devastated many communities and changed the lives of millions of Americans who experienced foreclosure or simply walked away from homes owing more than they were worth. 

Here’s what we heard from resident's of Miami Township in Montgomery County at the time - neighbors living near vacant and abandoned houses:

"It’s very disrupting. It’s an eyesore."

"It smells like there might be a dead animal in the backyard. Honestly, there’s like a whole bunch of flies and it’s pretty nasty."

The City of Dayton is suing several manufacturers that made products containing toxic chemicals that have threatened the city’s water supply. 

There are five companies named in the city of Dayton Lawsuit - 3M Company, Buckeye Fire Equipment Company, Chemguard, Inc., Tyco Fire Products L.P., and National Foam, Inc. 

The city says the defendants operated in Dayton at some time and used the chemical perfluorooctane sulfonate or PFOS in the manufacturing of a foam product used to fight fires.

Much of what remains of St. Elizabeth’s Hospital can be found on the fourth floor of the library at Wright State University. Old staff photos, patient intake records, and weathered maps of the hospital’s campus are all kept at the Special Collections and Archives Center at the university. The artifacts were donated to the school after the hospital closed.

“The hospital had three separate pieces of land...it was gigantic,” says archivist Bill Stolz, who helps maintain the collection. “They had an orchard, animals, and a small working farm.”

Nearly 100 people gathered at Dayton Boys Prep Academy Tuesday to learn more about the latest efforts to turn around Dayton Public Schools. The district, which received an overall grade of “F” on this year’s state report card, is trying to avoid state takeover next year.

15 years after the Wright brothers first flew at Kitty Hawk, airplanes were weapons.  The 12 horsepower motor and the frailties of the first airplane gave way to powerful engines. We tend to think of WWI as soldiers stuck in muddy trenches, but there was also fierce fighting in the sky. WWI airplanes flew much faster than early aircraft and soon were armed with guns and bombs.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of Dayton, Ohio’s sister city relationship with Oiso, Japan, and to mark the occasion, officials will welcome a delegation from Oiso to the city next summer.

Dayton actually has five sister cities around the world. “The oldest of which is Augsburg, Germany,” says Kevin Lydy, chair of the Dayton-Oiso Sister City Committee. “That [relationship] was established in 1964. Oiso, Japan is our second oldest, in 1968, and then we have three others: Holon, Israel, Sarajevo and Bosnia-Herzegovina, and then Monrovia and Liberia.”

richard cordray mike dewine dayton debate
Jay LaPrete / AP (file photos)

If you thought for a moment that the choice between Republican Mike DeWine and Democrat Richard Cordray for Ohio governor was a choice between Tweedle-dee and Tweedle-dum, get over it.

Dayton's Road To Recovery

Sep 19, 2018
dayton the path forward
TY GREENLEES / DAYTON DAILY NEWS STAFF

Like many smaller post-industrial cities, Dayton, Ohio, was hit hard by the Great Recession and continues efforts to transform its business and employee base to meet the needs of our new tech economy. The city also suffers a high poverty rate and has been battling the ongoing opioid crisis.

The designer of an iconic automobile has come back home to Dayton. Gale Halderman was born in Tipp City. He graduated from Bethel High School in 1950 and then attended art and design classes at the Dayton Art Institute. It may be surprising that the name behind one of America’s most popular sports cars didn’t set out to design anything like it.

“I loved to do lettering,” he says. “I used to letter all the school buses at school when I was in school. And then I saw this class that was designing televisions and bicycles and I thought, boy does that look exciting.”

The city’s aviation heritage was on full display Friday morning as Dayton History officials announced Carillon Park is now home to the John W. Berry, Sr. Wright Brothers National Museum.

Formerly known as the Wright Brothers Aviation Center, the federal designation as a national museum is a “game-changer,” says Dayton History President Brady Kress.

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