Donald Trump

donald trump cleveland ohio
Susan Walsh / AP

There is no doubt that in Ohio there are a whole lot of Republican voters who are feeling buyer's remorse today for falling under the spell of Donald Trump in 2016.

Updated: 12:41 p.m., Friday, Aug. 7, 2020

President Trump paid an election-season visit to Ohio Thursday to tout his manufacturing policies, launching attacks on Democratic rival Joe Biden during two appearances in the swing state.

Wearing a cloth mask, the president toured the Whirlpool washing machine factory in Clyde on Thursday afternoon. He spoke to an audience on the factory floor for a little less than an hour.

ted kennedy
Cameron Bloch / AP

So, the back-to-back presidential nominating conventions scheduled for later this month are apparently going to be virtual, bare-boned affairs with none of the manufactured hoopla of conventions in the past.

Thank goodness. May it ever be so in the future.

A new poll that shows President Donald Trump trailing former Vice President Joe Biden in Ohio also reveals that Mr. Biden’s “strong” supporters here outnumber Mr. Trump’s, a snapshot of the state less than 100 days from an election that will determine whether Ohio continues its unmatched swing-state streak.

Trump Expected In Northeast Ohio For Fundraiser Aug. 6

Aug 2, 2020

Updated: 11:05 a.m., Friday, July 31, 2020

President Donald Trump plans to drop into Northeast Ohio next week to raise money for his reelection bid, according to several Republican sources with knowledge of the plans.

joe biden donald trump
Alex Brandon, Patrick Semansky / AP

When this year began, few people in politics believed Ohio would be in play this presidential election, mainly because Donald Trump won the Buckeye State in 2016 with a comfortable eight percentage point cushion.

donald trump
Alex Brandon / AP

The national response to COVID-19 is virtually non-existent, critics of the Trump administration have argued. That has left states to fend for themselves with varied results, and now many are finding themselves staring at hotspot status as the coronavirus continues to spread.

john kasich
Tony Dejak / AP

Four years ago, then-Ohio Gov. John Kasich was technically the host of the Republican National Convention since it was taking place in downtown Cleveland, part of his home state.

The first presidential debate of the general election is making a detour to Cleveland after coronavirus concerns prompted the University of Notre Dame to pull out of the event.

WVXU

Why was President Donald Trump's unfounded conspiracy theory about absentee voting at the top of WKRC-TV's Facebook page for hours on Tuesday?

Is Local 12 endorsing or agreeing with the claim he's made for years – without providing any proof – that "Mail-In Voting, unless changed by the courts, will lead to the most CORRUPT ELECTION in our Nation's History! #RIGGED ELECTION."

President Trump took to the White House briefing room on Tuesday to praise his administration's response to the virus that has killed more than 140,000 Americans so far. In a reversal of his recent statements and tone, he acknowledged the severity of the pandemic and urged Americans to comply with preventative measures.

"It will likely unfortunately get worse before it gets better," Trump said in uncharacteristically somber remarks, encouraging Americans to social distance, practice good hygiene and wear masks.

Updated at 7:50 p.m. ET

President Trump spoke in the White House Rose Garden on a broad range of topics on Tuesday, pitching himself as the stronger competitor over rival Joe Biden to manage the deadly coronavirus pandemic and steer the U.S. economy to prosperity.

His remarks come amid mounting concerns raised by public health officials about his administration's aggressive pitch to return the United States to normalcy, including pushing guidance for schools to reopen for in-person classes this fall.

A new Quinnipiac poll of registered voters shows Ohio may be a swing state once again. The race between President Trump and likely Democratic nominee Joe Biden is a virtual dead heat with a little over four months to go before the November election.

donald trump tulsa
Evan Vucci / AP

President Trump is back on the campaign trail, but in Tulsa on Saturday, he was not met with the overflow crowd he expected. The Oklahoma arena was roughly one-third full of supporters.

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

President Trump signed an executive order on Tuesday encouraging police departments to improve training — a step critics say falls short of what is needed to curb police officers' use of force against nonwhites.

The order comes as the president faces tremendous pressure to take action following the killing of George Floyd at the hands of police last month.

ce friday
Jim Nolan / WVXU

Recent days in Cincinnati have brought to our city a series of daily events in which people call for justice following the deaths of black Americans at the hands of police. The protests here mirror the unrest gripping much of the nation.

rob portman
Alex Brandon / AP

As protests continue across Ohio and the country, the state's Republican U.S. Senator says President Trump could be doing more to help those demonstrations from spiraling into violence.

donald trump bible
Patrick Semansky / AP

The Episcopal Bishop of Southern Ohio, the Rev. Thomas E. Breidenthal, has joined a chorus of voices in condemning President Trump for using St. John's Episcopal Church, a historic church near the White House, as the setting for a photo opportunity Monday.

Updated at 9:31 p.m. ET

Escalating his rhetoric during a period of roiling national crises, President Trump on Monday threatened to deploy the U.S. military to cities or states that don't take "necessary" actions to halt violent protests, saying the armed forces will "quickly solve the problem for them."

Trump's Rose Garden remarks came as just across the street, law enforcement officers deployed tear gas and shot rubber bullets to forcefully disperse peaceful protesters. Washington, D.C., had set a curfew Monday of 7 p.m. ET.

president donald trump mask
Alex Brandon / AP

President Donald Trump is one of Twitter's most prolific users, but this week he turned his ire toward the social media platform, claiming that it censors conservative viewpoints.

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