Donald Trump

Evan Vucci / AP

The Senate is holding a trial on the impeachment of President Trump, who is accused by the U.S. House of abusing his power and obstructing Congress. At the conclusion of the trial, senators are expected to vote on whether Trump should be removed from office.

Each day of the trial will stream through this player as proceedings begin. Due to the nature of live events, all times are approximate and subject to change, often on short notice. If it is after the scheduled start time and the below video does not play, please try refreshing the page. 

donald trump cincinnati
John Minchillo / AP

Donald Trump won the White House in 2016, despite losing the popular vote, because three states - Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, and Michigan - gave him wins by paper-thin margins, while Ohio went for Trump by eight percentage points. That was enough to push Trump over the 270 electoral vote threshold he needed to defeat Hillary Clinton.

The chair of Ohio’s New African Immigrants Commission says "it just doesn't make a lot of sense" that President Trump could include Nigeria, the native country of a growing number of Columbus residents, in a planned expansion of his travel ban policy.

President Trump has often surrounded himself with lawyers whom he sees as being good on television. But Pat Cipollone, the attorney who will play a leading role in Trump's Senate impeachment trial defense, is better known for working behind the scenes.

sheriff jim neil
Amanda Lee Myers / AP

For any politician, getting the boot from your own political party is no easy feat to accomplish.

donald trump
Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP

The Senate is holding a trial on the impeachment of President Trump, who is accused by the U.S. House of abusing his power and obstructing Congress. At the conclusion of the trial, senators are expected to vote on whether Trump should be removed from office.

Each day of the trial will stream through this player as proceedings begin. Due to the nature of live events, all times are approximate and subject to change, often on short notice. If it is after the scheduled start time and the below video does not play, please try refreshing the page. 

rob portman
John Minchillo / AP

Earlier this week, Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, was interviewed on Cincinnati Edition by host Michael Monks on several subjects, including Portman's role as a juror in the upcoming Senate trial of President Trump on impeachment charges.

Updated at 3:10 p.m. ET

Amid much pomp and circumstance, the Senate took some of its first steps on Thursday to prepare for next week's impeachment trial of President Trump, just the third such trial in Senate history.

Chief Justice John Roberts, having crossed First Street from the Supreme Court building over to the Capitol, joined senators in the chamber and then was sworn in by Senate President pro tempore Chuck Grassley of Iowa. Roberts will preside over the trial.

donald trump
Evan Vucci / AP

The Democratic candidates for president - or at least a shrunken version of the current active roster - appeared together on stage for their final debate ahead of the Iowa caucus. We are just two-and-a-half weeks away from the votes being cast in the 2020 presidential primary. Did Tuesday's debate have any effect?

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET

The House of Representatives has delivered articles of impeachment against President Trump to the Senate, which is expected to begin a trial next week.

Earlier in the day, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi named seven Democratic members of Congress as the managers who will argue the case for impeachment.

Those managers brought the articles to the Senate on Wednesday evening.

The location, timing and message of this Trump rally could be a preview of his re-election strategy.

Updated at 5 p.m. ET

President Trump said that Iran appears "to be standing down" after Tuesday night's missile attack in Iraq and that "the American people should be extremely grateful and happy no Americans were harmed."

Trump, in a nationally televised address from the White House, also announced a new round of what he termed "punishing economic sanctions" against the Iranian government. And he called on NATO to become "much more involved in the Middle East process."

mitch mcconnell
Andrew Harnik / AP

Kentucky's congressmen and senators provided mixed reactions to the assassination of Iran's powerful military leader Qassem Soleimani during a U.S. military airstrike on Friday.

donald trump cincinnati
Howard Wilkinson / WVXU

Ohio is expected to play a vital role in President Donald Trump's 2020 campaign. No Republican has ever won a race for the White House without carrying the state, and supporters say they plan to win in Ohio again with a common talking point: the economy.

Updated at 9:27 p.m. ET

House lawmakers voted to impeach President Trump on Wednesday in only the third such rebuke in American history.

The move triggers a trial for Trump in the Senate, expected in January — one in which majority Republicans are likely to permit him to retain his office.

The vote was 230 to 197 on the first of two articles of impeachment — abuse of power — with one member voting present. The House then passed the second article — obstruction of Congress — with a vote of 229 to 198, with one member voting present.

Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., dismissed the impeachment process against President Trump as a political proceeding rather than a judicial one.

"I'm not an impartial juror. This is a political process. There's not anything judicial about it," McConnell told reporters on Tuesday. "The House made a partisan political decision to impeach. I would anticipate we will have a largely partisan outcome in the Senate. I'm not impartial about this at all."

Updated at 8:56 p.m. ET

President Trump is now just the third president in American history to be impeached.

Lawmakers passed two articles of impeachment against Trump. The first article, which charges Trump with abuse of power, was approved largely along a party-line vote, 230-197-1. The second article, on obstructing Congress, passed 229-198-1.

Updated at 12:12 p.m. ET

The House Judiciary Committee on Friday approved two articles of impeachment against President Trump, making him the fourth president in American history to face impeachment.

In contrast to Thursday's contentious back-and-forth between the two parties, Friday's session was devoid of rancor, or even any debate. Immediately after calling the session to order, Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., ordered two votes, one for each article. Both were approved 23-17 along party lines.

Updated at 11:38 p.m. ET

Planned votes on two articles of impeachment against President Trump were delayed late Thursday night by Rep. Jerry Nadler, the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee. He asked members to consider how they want to vote and to reconvene at 10 a.m. Friday.

Ranking minority member Rep. Doug Collins and others protested that Nadler had upset the committee's plans without consulting them.

The Judiciary Committee had sparred for more than 12 hours Thursday ahead of expected votes.

Updated at 10:50 p.m. ET

House Democrats began work on completing their articles of impeachment against President Trump Wednesday evening, setting the stage for a vote by the full House.

The Judiciary Committee convened to amend the impeachment legislation introduced Tuesday by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., with its chairman, Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., calling the facts against Trump "overwhelming" and that Congress must act now to protect the integrity of U.S. election and its national security.

rob portman
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Let's say you have been called to jury duty in your county courthouse and you dutifully attend each day until you are assigned to a jury pool in a criminal case.

Updated at 8:50 p.m. ET

House Democrats unveiled two articles of impeachment against President Trump on Tuesday morning, charging him with abuse of power in the Ukraine affair and obstruction of Congress.

Read the articles of impeachment here.

Liam James Doyle / NPR

The House Judiciary Committee is holding a hearing on the impeachment inquiry report completed by the House Intelligence Committee, as it moves toward drafting articles of impeachment. Watch the hearing live.

The hearing is scheduled to begin at 9 a.m. ET. If it is after the scheduled start time and the below video does not play, please try refreshing the page. 

donald trump
Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP

The House Judiciary Committee holds its first hearing in the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump starting at 10 a.m. ET Wednesday.

If it is after the scheduled start time and the below video doesn't play, please try refreshing the page.

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eeyore
JD Hancock / Flickr Creative Commons

Everyone knows that the donkey is the mascot and symbol of the Democratic Party, and has been for some time.

pete buttigieg
Chris Carlson / AP

After several days of intense public hearings surrouding the U.S. House's impeachment inquiry into President Donald J. Trump's alleged "quid pro quo" involving Ukraine and American military aid funds, what is next on Capitol Hill?

Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR

The U.S. House of Representatives is holding open hearings in its impeachment inquiry into President Trump.

All hearings will be streamed through this video player as they are live. Hearings are scheduled to begin at 9 a.m. ET. If it is after the scheduled start time and the below video does not play, please try refreshing the page. 

More From NPR: 

Updated at 5:15 p.m. ET

President Trump had what he called a "wonderful and very productive" meeting with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Wednesday, at the same time as House impeachment hearings got underway on the other end of Pennsylvania Avenue.

The House begins public impeachment inquiry hearings Wednesday. It’s the latest step in a possible move towards impeachment of President Trump by the House. Meanwhile, many in the Republican-controlled Senate, including Rob Portman (R-OH), are waiting to see what new information comes out.

Updated at 5:21 p.m. ET

A State Department staffer overheard President Trump asking a top diplomat about "investigations" he wanted Ukraine to pursue that he believed might help him in the 2020 election, another senior diplomat told Congress.

That staffer is expected to tell his story directly to House investigators at a closed-door deposition on Friday.

The new subplot about the overheard phone conversation was one of a small number of new details to emerge from Democrats' first open hearing in their impeachment inquiry into Trump on Wednesday.

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